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I want to use a word similar to unbelievable, but with a completely negative and ironic sense.

What word could I use and how would I use it?

Example:

The fact that you do that is unbelievable for me.

I feel that unbelievable sometimes carries a good and interesting image—similar to crazy and awesome. Is it just a matter of expression and accent?

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Welcome to EL&U. What exactly do you want to say? I'm not sure why you want to use the word "unbelievable" in the first place. Placed alongside the words "crazy" and "awesome" these are all words that tend to be used in a fairly meaningless way to signify something like "Wow! I'm interested!". Are you just looking for a list of words that can be used in that general way? –  FumbleFingers Jul 3 '11 at 4:59
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You might have a look at these:

dubious
implausible
far-fetched

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Depends on the situation, but I like the word preposterous (meaning completely ridiculous and bizarre..unthinkable). Lots of fun words in around that area - absurd, outrageous, insane, incredible. Mix and match in a sentence to add extra punch :)

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If I understand your question correctly, then the tone of one's voice makes a big difference to the meaning of "unbelievable". For example, compare:

This is unbelievable!

and

This is just unbelievable.

The first example, if said with an upward inflection, implies that it is unbelievable in a good way, while the second example, if said with a more downward inflection, has a more negative connotation.

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It's not quite as simple as that, but you're fundamentally right. Victor Meldrew would agree. –  user1579 Jul 5 '11 at 13:28
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The term beyond belief is, as far as I know, always used in a negative way. It is often used to convey the speaker's dismay or disgust towards a despicable act carried out by someone.

Here's an example of usage:

"The fact that he went ahead and did that is beyond belief, especially considering the fact that he, of all people, should have known better."

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