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There's like people who do baby-sitting, that is look after infants and toddlers for the parents. What do we call people who do this for the elderly? For example, my friend hires a "elder-sitter" for her mother. It's not a professional, just someone who knows how to care for the elderly.

Is there a name for this person?

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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Caregiver is the professional term. I'm not certain if there is a less formal word.

caregiver |ˈkɛrˈgɪvər| noun a family member or paid helper who regularly looks after a child or a sick, elderly, or disabled person.

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Welcome to English.SE! Congratulations on your successful answer! –  Daniel Jul 2 '11 at 15:28
    
Thanks, I'm new here. –  zenbike Jul 2 '11 at 17:17
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Carer.

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This is probably UK specific, in American English we would use Caregiver. –  Caleb Jul 2 '11 at 9:01
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It can carry a slightly negative/mocking connotation, but the closest term I've heard to what you're asking for is granny-sitter.

(Others have given the more formal/polite terms such as carer/caregiver, though these might be taken to imply either a professional role, or a permanent duty due to family ties.)

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This works, but not for elderly men so much. –  Ed Guiness Jul 2 '11 at 17:50
    
+1 Lol, granny sitter! DIMS? –  Thursagen Jul 4 '11 at 11:04
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