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There is another form of the same sentence — "It has been removed".

But in the sentence "It is removed," the last word is an adjective so I believe it is correct as well. Am I right?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is removed is grammatically correct, but is not something people normally say. It sounds quite stilted.

The only context I can think of would be as a reply from a "right hand man" to his boss, if the right hand man was particularly well spoken:

Boss: This room is too cluttered. Remove this obelisk.

RHM: Yes sir.

(RHM gestures to minions. Minions remove the obelisk.)

RHM: It is removed.

A much more common idiom is it is [far] removed from X which implies the thing that it refers to is [very] different to X.

E.g.

This chaise longue is far removed from the stools of your hovel, eh?

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+1, epic examples –  Joseph Weissman Jun 23 '11 at 21:37
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To my ears, "It is removed" strongly sounds like you're saying "It is regularly/habitually removed", i.e. expressing an action that generally occurs rather than the state of something that has been removed on a single occasion.

For the meaning you're interested in, I would stick to "It has been removed".

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Not really. And if you change the adjective, even less so; "It is gone" sounds fine. –  Jez Jun 23 '11 at 17:10
    
NB "remove" and "go" are different types of verb. –  Neil Coffey Jun 23 '11 at 18:35
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"It is removed" would be a description of the event as it is happening. "It was removed" matches a description of something was removed some other time than now.

Where is my chair?! / It was removed.

I don't like that. Get it out of here. / It is removed.

"It has been removed" is similar to "it was removed".

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