Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Interviews that asked past behavior questions demonstrated superior validity for predicting performance because they provide for an assessment of motivation to apply knowledge/skills more effectively than situational questions.

In above sentence, what does "provide for" mean? I'm confused with the extra(?) "for".

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Don't think of it as an extra "for"; "provide for" in this sentence is shorthand for provide an opportunity for. A better replacement would be allow.

"Interviews... allow an assessment of motivation..."

share|improve this answer
    
But, If I shorten the sentence as this: they provide an opportunity for an assessment more effectively than situational questions. I still couldn't make the point of this sentence. seems something is missing, but I couldn't tell what is missing. Which verb does "more effectively" describe? "provide" or "to apply" –  czh Jun 21 '11 at 7:31
    
"Interviews that asked questions about how the interviewee had acted in the past were better at predicting future performance, because they allowed the interviewer to assess the candidate's motivation more effectively than questions about hypothetical situations." –  MT_Head Jun 21 '11 at 7:36
    
@czh - now that you mention it, the sentence was poorly written to begin with: the author got lost in the middle of that mile-long sentence, and matched "more effectively" with "to apply" instead of with "assessment". It's not your reading comprehension that's lacking, it's the author's writing skill. –  MT_Head Jun 21 '11 at 7:41
    
@czh - Going back to the original sentence (rather than my paraphrase), what the author probably intended was this: "Interviews that asked past behavior questions demonstrated superior validity for predicting performance because they provide for a more effective assessment of motivation to apply knowledge/skills than situational questions." –  MT_Head Jun 21 '11 at 7:46
add comment

Provide for in this case mean:

permit to be attainable or cause to remain

So, your example is saying that the "interviews that asked past behaviour questions" will "permit" "assessment of motivation to apply knowledge/skills" "to be attainable".

In other words, certain of the interview questions make assessment of motivation possible.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.