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Is it same as come from, but use in formal relationship ?

This is the context.

I hail from commercial division of midas bank.

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3 Answers

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I personally consider the phrase 'hail from' to be rather archaic and not formal.

I'm employed in the commercial division of midas bank.
I come from the commercial division of midas bank.
I'm from the commercial division of midas bank.
I work in the comercial division of midas bank.

The use of the phrase 'hail from' reminds me of the days of playing Dungeons and Dragons, "Hail and well met, fellow traveler!" and so forth.

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Hail

"to call from a distance," 1560s, originally nautical, from hail (interj.). Related: Hailed; hailing. Hail fellow well met is 1580s, from a familiar greeting. Hail Mary (c.1300) is the angelic salutation (L. ave Maria), cf. Luke i.58, used as a devotional recitation. As a desperation play in U.S. football, attested by 1940. To hail from is 1841, originally nautical. "Hail, Columbia," the popular patriotic song, was a euphemism for "hell" in Amer.Eng. slang from c.1850-1910.

(emphasis mine) I'm not sure if to hail from is applicable to commercial, or any other for this matter, division of any company. To hail from means to originate from. You surely weren't born and raised in commercial division, were you?

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I just got the phase from an anime. –  Sarawut Positwinyu Jun 19 '11 at 11:11
    
@Sarawut Positwinyu I've seen several phrases there I'm not quite ok with, to be honest. They're not always subbed by native speakers after all. –  Philoto Jun 19 '11 at 16:08
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As reported from the NOAD, hail from means "have one's home or origins in (a place)."
I have never heard anybody saying hail from when referring to the place where he works (or worked), even if I could understand if somebody would use hail from to mean the place where (figuratively) they had their professional origins.

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