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In these sentences below, does it makes a difference if I replace if with since?

1)If you are unemployed, why did you leave your last job?
2)If you are innocent, why did you flee?
3)If you are a Christian, why do you believe in a personal God like this?

My questions:

  1. Does if here suggest a hypothesis, which means anyone who speaks these words is not sure or does not admit the fact?
  2. Does replacing if with since make the clause a fact rather than a hypothesis?
  3. If replacing if with since does make a difference, can if still be used if the context can imply that the clause is indeed a fact?

Thank you in advance!

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2  
They are not interchangeable. Trust me on this. – Ricky Jan 17 at 4:24
1  
Great question, +1) – Rathony Jan 17 at 4:35
    
I have never heard or seen a learner who confused if with since before. Do these words mean the same in your native tongue? – Mari-Lou A Jan 17 at 7:27
    
@ Mari-Lou A, no, they are two words and the difference is clear-cut. – Shim Shay Jan 17 at 8:25
    
@Mari-LouA I found 3 to be the interesting part of this question. Being In a situation where you could replace if with since doesn't mean you have to. – CandiedOrange Jan 17 at 8:32
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes it does.

1)Since you are unemployed, why did you leave your last job?
2)Since you are innocent, why did you flee?
3)Since you are a Christian, why do you believe in a personal God like this?

Now these all assert something to be true, where before they only assumed something might be true.

1) Does if here suggest a hypothesis, which means anyone who speaks these words is not sure or does not admit the fact?

This is true only insofar as the use of if itself does not imply the fact. It can be used in contexts where the fact has already been implied. It's in those cases that a switch to since can be considered. But that doesn't necessarily make use of if wrong.

"You say you're too busy to talk. If that's true, why are you still talking about it?"

"You say you're too busy to talk. Since that's true, why are you still talking about it?"

2) Does replacing "if" with "since" make the clause a fact rather than a hypothesis?

Yes. Since should not be used unless asserting a fact.

3) If replacing "if" with "since" does make a difference, can "if"still be used if the context can imply that the clause is indeed a fact?

Yes. If can be used independent of knowledge of fact. If can be used to indicate assumption of fact (hypothesis) or to lay out conditions used to select between options.

"If you are as short as we all know you are then you can't ride the rollercoaster"

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Excellent answer! – Yasha Jan 17 at 5:02

'Since' would be used when the condition is assumed to be surely true. The other would be used to even question the condition.

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