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I'm not talking about onomatopoeia—I don't mean a word that describes a sound—I mean something along the lines of an aptronym, i.e. a perfect name such as Anthony Camera for a photographer (true story). What is the word for when a word just sounds like exactly what it means? I heard the word for this once, long ago, and have since forgotten it.

"Push" and "Pull" might be examples, in that the sounds they form evoke the physical actions denoted.

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

Perhaps you're thinking of an ideophone, a broader idea than just onomatopoeia (not restricted to sound).

Mark Dingemanse explains ideophones:

English, for example, has ideophonic words like glimmer, twiddle, tinkle which are depictive of sensory imagery: their form betrays something of their meaning in ways that words "chair" and "dog" do not.

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That's the one! Thank you! –  tajmo Jun 7 '11 at 18:43
    
Just as a point of interest, Japanese is curious in that it conflates onomatopoeic and ideophonic nouns, e.g., "niko-niko" for gleaming teeth, "koro-koro" for rolling logs, and "kyoro-kyoro" for wandering around aimlessly. –  The Raven Jun 7 '11 at 20:14
    
@TheRaven: how is that conflating them? –  Mechanical snail Oct 11 '11 at 1:34

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