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What is the right thing to say ?

"You are welcome"

"You are welcomed"

"You welcome"

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up vote 11 down vote accepted

"You are welcome," though it's usually shortened to "You're welcome."

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What is the right thing to say ?

"You are welcome"

"You are welcomed"

"You welcome"

Depending on the context, any one of them could be the right thing to say.

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2  
I think only the first would be appropriate as a stand-alone sentence. The second might work in certain contexts, but the third would not be a complete sentence; the speaker would need to specify what 'you' welcome. – pkaeding Sep 10 '10 at 23:09
    
I can invent a context in which any of them work. – delete Sep 11 '10 at 7:22
    
Can you please provide me the example? – GBackMania Sep 12 '10 at 2:15
    
RE inventing context for each: Sure, but unless you spell out those contexts, it's not much help to the person asking the question. – Jay Mar 30 '12 at 4:13
    
I don't think that "You welcome" is correct in any context. – Hot Licks Mar 3 '15 at 16:56

I say "you're welcome" as a response to the phrase "thank you" (you're welcomed when I show hospitality).

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I say, "You are welcomed!" As in:

You are welcomed to my time and effort—think nothing of it!

abbreviated to "You are welcomed." Another example of the use of you are welcomed would be

You are welcomed to anything in the pantry that suits your fancy

versus, as is often said, "You are welcome to ...." Think parallels: You are invited to help yourself to anything in the pantry." What would you say to this: "You are invite to help yourself to anything in the pantry." What??? The latter example shouts the answer loud and clear to native speakers who understand the nuances of language—and the answer isn't using 'you are welcome.'

Not sure why I'm picky about this particular phrase, because other rules I transgress without a second thought.

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It has always made more grammatical sense to me, to say "You're welcomED"(verb or adj.) in response to a "thank you" instead of "Welcome"(adj) since you are stating that the person to whom you are responding to is being "welcomed" for doing something. It's like the word "curse".... You might say, "You're cursed"(verb or adj.), Not, "You're curse" (noun). – Norma Oct 22 '15 at 20:05
1  
Except that curse is not an adjective, whereas welcome is. – Andrew Leach Oct 22 '15 at 21:44

protected by tchrist Oct 22 '15 at 20:55

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