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My son loves Grease and watches it over and over.

So I am starting memorizing it all, but there are some phrases I don't understand.

Please explain exactly what this part means (it is before the car race between Danny and Leo - Scorpion's leader):

Leo: Good, 'cos we're racing for pinks.

Danny: Pinks?

Leo: Pinks, you punk! Pink slips! Ownership papers!

Danny: Oh, ho, ho, ho, ho, ho!

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3  
Not germane to your question, but since you are interested in improving your English: "May you" is almost never idiomatic. "May" is asking for or granting permission, so "May you" doesn't make sense. "Will you", "would you", "can you" or "could you" would all fit here, with very little difference in meaning: "can/could" are a little more tentative than "will/would", and "would/could" are a little more tentative than "will/can", so "Could you" is the most tentative, and so the most polite. –  Colin Fine Jun 1 '11 at 14:38
    
question edited... Thanks a lot! –  user193655 Jun 1 '11 at 14:47
    
@Colin: 100% agree that "could you" is politest in British English, but I've heard that "would you" can come across better in the US (at least in some regions/dialects) - but we'd need a US native speaker to confirm :) –  psmears Jun 2 '11 at 13:15
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I think your punctuation of the last line is wrong. It should be:

Leo: Pinks, you punk. Pink slips. Ownership papers?

In other words, they're racing for pink-colored documents which grant ownership of a car.

(Note that the phrase "pink slip" in English is normally a euphemism for a notice of termination of employment. The usage of "pink slip" in this case is somewhat unusual.)

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Ok so assumin Ben Hocking is right is it correct to say that the following has the same meaning: "Pinks, you stupid. Pinks documents. The cars' owhership papers?" –  user193655 Jun 1 '11 at 14:22
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@Pim, pretty close. In more idiomatic English I'd paraphrase thusly: Pinks, you idiot. Pink documents. The cars' ownership papers? –  JSBձոգչ Jun 1 '11 at 14:24
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At least in my experience, the usage of pink slip to mean a car title isn't unusual at all. –  Dusty Jun 1 '11 at 14:24
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"Racing for slips" or "racing for pinks" is common street racing slang for putting up the loser's car as the prize. –  KitFox Jun 1 '11 at 14:33
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In California, the title to a car is indeed called a "pink slip." The actual document is (or at least, used to be) pink. I can't recall hearing this terminology on the East coast (the title will look different depending on the state that issues it). –  Peter Shor Jun 1 '11 at 14:54
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Pinks is a slang term for ownership documents to a vehicle. The term is still used by most street racers in the US. Pink slips are also used for terminating employment, back in the 1950s when this movie was staged, the registration papers were in fact pink.

But he does have a rather sarcastic response in the movie when asked the question "pinks?" He was sarcastic because he thought Danny who was about to race him should have known that reference to the ownership documents to the car considering it is used by most street racers. And they are not racing for the pink ladies they are racing for pink slips— which would mean who wins the race would then own their opponent's vehicle!

And they are not racing for the pink ladies they are racing for pink slips which would mean whomever wins the race with then own their opponents vehicle! More importantly Danny wants to race to prove a point but he ends up getting hurt and isn't able to so his best friend has to race for him. They basically want to show loe that he's not the best at everything.

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Actually, it's Kenickie who was originally supposed to race and got hurt — thus prompting Danny to drive instead. –  Cat Jun 21 at 23:09
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protected by RegDwigнt Jun 22 at 0:05

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