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What does this mean?

Project is testable.

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3  
"The project is testable" would be an improvement. (Other details seem to be lacking though, but perhaps [I assume] this is due to the omission of other sentences from the same paragraph.) –  Randolf Richardson May 30 '11 at 17:39
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But, I can't understand what this sentence exactly means. –  misho May 30 '11 at 17:45
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@msiho the project (presumably software) is either designed in such a way that software tests can be run, OR it has reached the point that it is ready for testing. It's terse but is valid –  mgb May 30 '11 at 17:52
    
@Martin Beckett Many thanks! –  misho May 30 '11 at 17:54
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@Martin, your comment seems to have solved misho's problem, can you please move it to an answer? @misho, If this is from the software development domain then the sentences "the project is testable", "the software is testable", "the software is now ready for testing", "the project is now in testing phase" all mean different things and hence your sentence either needs to be put in context properly or needs to revised. Cheers, –  user8944 May 30 '11 at 18:01
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The project is testable.

The project (presumably software) is either designed in such a way that software tests can be run, OR it has reached the point that it is ready for testing.

The sentence is a bit terse but correct.

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