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His book name is "Wild Stringdom", I don't understand... — what is it? I'm from Russia and I speak English very bad. I want to translate this book for me into Russian.

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3 Answers 3

It's a play on words: "Stringdom" sounds like "Kingdom". The phrase "Wild Kingdom" refers to the world of wild animals and plants and brings to mind images of hunting lions, herds of antelope, weird South American spiders, etc. My guess is that Petrucci is trying to convey an image of his playing style and his career as exotic, wild, untrammeled, free at heart, not constrained by the conforming influences of civilization, etc.

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When John and I were young, there was a television show called Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom. Mutual of Omaha is a big insurance company, and the show, besides getting the company's name out there, was all about Marlon Perkins narrorating as he sent Jim Perkins out to get way-too-close to wild and exotic animals. –  VarLogRant Apr 13 '11 at 13:10
    
thank you guys for your interesting and full answers))) I like this book) –  Anonymous Apr 20 '11 at 9:55

I'm not sure if I understand it correctly — I want someone to approve me, because that is just my opinion. But as far as I know that is a complex word or not a word at all.

Let's see, there are some words you can translate:

  • kingdom
  • boredom
  • freedom

It appears that adding "-dom" to a word makes the new word mean "some place for its initial word where this initial word really matters". So kingdom is a place for and directed by a king, boredom is when you just feel bore, freedom is a place where free really matters.

Stringdom must be some "wild" place for strings where they play the general role.

A Russian manner according on Kingdom translation I can translate it as "Дикое Струннолевство".

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One might consider stringdom to be a portmanteau (combining the words string and kingdom).

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