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I have two verbs in a sentence. I know I have to use 'to' before each verb. But in this case it sounds a little bit strange to me.

Should I use to there?

Test that this method returns right data and to works correctly.

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What do you want to say? Improve your question, because as it is, it's rather unclear, in my opinion. –  Alenanno May 23 '11 at 11:02
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No, "and (test that it) works correctly". –  user8568 May 23 '11 at 11:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No.

Your sentence is grammatically incorrect as given. Without to and with an extra the, it is correct:

Test that this method returns the right data and works correctly.

(The is needed with right data since right implies that there is only one acceptable set of data.)

I’m not sure why you would expect that to to be there.

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But, as I know I have to use 'to' before each verb. Right? –  misho May 23 '11 at 11:11
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I guess he's confused with the "infinite" to + verb... @Misho: only when it's infinite or when the previous statement requires it (and it usually requires an infinite tense so...), but not always. –  Alenanno May 23 '11 at 11:12
    
@Alenanno: Now it's clear! Many thanks! –  misho May 23 '11 at 11:17
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There are some verbs, such as refuse, that take infinitives like "to work" after them; for example: "I refuse to work on Sundays." There are some verbs that don't, such as test. As far as I know, there is no rule; you just have to memorize or look up which verbs are which. –  Peter Shor May 23 '11 at 11:18
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Related to what @Peter says: Verbs followed by... –  RegDwigнt May 23 '11 at 11:53

In addition to the excellent answers already given, I wanted to make a pitch for using parallel structure. It has helped me figure out some otherwise tricky sentence constructions. In general, you want your verbs to match when they are associated using an and or an or. In your sentence:

Test that this method returns right data and to works correctly.

the verbs that you want to match are "returns" and "works", because they are joined by the and. This would give you two alternatives:

Test that this method returns right data and works correctly.

OR

Test that this method to return right data and to work correctly.

Now since "returns" and "works" goes with "this method", the infinitive doesn't work here, so we're left with:

Test that this method returns right data and works correctly.

(@PLL is right about adding the "the" as well.)

As an example of how you might structure the sentence to use parallel infinitives, consider:

Run a test to see if this method returns the correct data and to check for errors.

In this construction, "to see" and "to check" are coordinated with the and, so they should match. Matching with infinitives is less strict, though, because it is okay to drop the extra to:

Run a test to see if this method returns the correct data and check for errors.

Although personally, I think it is less clear this way.

This crib sheet has some other examples of parallelism, including other parts of speech.

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Excellent work! Thank you very much! –  misho May 23 '11 at 13:40

Without really knowing what your example sentence is supposed to mean... I can tell you that "to works" is incorrect. It's either "to work" or "works".

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You don't need the 'to' necessarily, but the sentence has errors beyond the 'to'.

Try this:

Run a test to see if this method returns the correct data and that it works correctly.

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