Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I first moved to Washington state, I would see mystifying traffic warning signs that would announce "Traffic Revision Ahead" as I was driving and then be in the midst of roadwork and lane changes a few seconds later.

I don't recall exactly what signs said in my home state of Nebraska for this situation but I think they would post a sequence of signs, a "Roadwork Ahead" followed by a "Lane Changes Necessary" indication. Either that or a display of "Detour Ahead" before the work.

Once I understood by context what I was in for when I saw such signs, I used to imagine a civil engineer sitting at a desk thinking "I have a vision; No... I have a revision".

Is this usage of "Traffic Revision" known anywhere else in the English speaking world, or is this a coinage specific to Washington state in the United States?

share|improve this question
2  
I would expect a sign that says "New Traffic Pattern Ahead," but I do most of my driving in the Northeast U.S. –  Peter Shor May 13 '11 at 10:53
    
I like that expression much more than "Traffic Revision", which I find to be extremely obtuse and confusing. When I first saw Washington's signs I couldn't imagine in what sense traffic could be revised. That confusion led to several terrifying driving moments until I caught on. –  David Luebbert May 13 '11 at 11:21
    
I have never encountered "revision" in this context. –  horatio Jul 26 '11 at 16:09
add comment

2 Answers

I have never encountered any such sign, but then I didn't drive a lot in the US or UK. It's definitely not specific to Washington, as evidenced by this picture from Oregon and another one from Vancouver.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, F'x. Now I wonder if this is a Northwest phenomena. Also wonder which locale first used the term in signage. –  David Luebbert May 13 '11 at 11:24
add comment

In the UK, "New Road Layout Ahead" seems to be universal. It might even enshrined in some obscure law, I know a lot of road signs are.

New Road Layout Ahead

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.