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Is this grammatically correct?

You see in front of you a dirt block, above which a stone block.

If not how should it be fixed?

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3  
Hello Claudiu and welcome to the site. Please try to be as specific as possible in the wording of your questions. (What is causing the confusion — the preposition, the pronoun, something else?) General proofreading requests are off-topic here as per the FAQ. Note that you can always improve your questions by clicking the edit link. Thank you and welcome again. –  RegDwigнt May 12 '11 at 15:42

3 Answers 3

Nope. This is better:

You see in front of you a dirt block, above which is a stone block.

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In some literary forms of English, that would be acceptable. In everyday English "which" introduces a relative clause which requires a verb.

So dfan's suggestion is the least change which makes it acceptable in ordinary English; but the "above which" also renders it quite formal, so Mike Vaughan's suggestions are more natural.

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How about this?

You see in front of you a dirt block, above it, a stone block.

or

You see in front of you a dirt block, which has above it a stone block.

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5  
What about "You see in front of you a dirt block; above it, a stone block." that sounds pretty good –  Claudiu May 12 '11 at 15:35
1  
@Claudiu I think it's better to use the semicolon in the first example, yes. And in the second example, the second comma is extraneous. –  Matthew Read May 12 '11 at 15:50

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