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When do you use “Did + 1st form” instead of “2nd form”

When is do used in affirmative sentences? For example:

I do think that this is going to be...

Is it only used to emphasize a concept?

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marked as duplicate by RegDwigнt Nov 23 '12 at 12:04

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, since

I do think apples are good.

and

I think apples are good.

mean the same thing.

I think it's just for emphasis.

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If someone said, "You don't think apples are good", just responding, "I think apples are good" would sound like an echo or incomplete thought. In that case, using "do" for emphasis is almost mandatory. (Alternatively, you could heavily stress the word "I".) –  David Schwartz Jul 26 '12 at 9:55
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Could be used in either of these two situations, with quite different nuances:

  • Refuting a claim: "You're lazy! You don't work hard enough."..."What? I DO work hard!".

  • Admitting the truth of a statement: "You should work less or you'll have a heart attack."..."Maybe you're right, I DO work hard."

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