Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been using the following phrases but I am still not confident that they are grammatically correct and sound right:

  • "in regards with something"
  • "with regards to something"
  • "regarding something"

I have also heard/read people using an arbitrary combination of the above (e.g. "in regards to"). Are those correct? If yes - are they equivalent or the usage depends on context?

share|improve this question
1  
Related: english.stackexchange.com/questions/320/… –  Jonik Sep 3 '10 at 11:08
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I have been using the following phrases but I am still not confident that they are grammatically correct and sound right:

"in regards with something"

"in regard to" is the right way here.

"with regards to something"

This is OK. Somehow I have the feeling that "with regard to" is more normal though. Paul Brians seems to back this up.

"regarding something"

This is OK, e.g. film title "Regarding Henry", etc.

I have also heard/read people using an arbitrary combination of the above (e.g. "in regards to"). Are those correct? If yes - are they equivalent or the usage depends on context?

It's much easier to answer your question if you put in some examples you've seen. Anyway I hope the above is enough.

Note that there is a completely different usage "regards to" as in "give my regards to old Broadway and tell them I will soon be there" etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't it be "in regard to" then? Also are "in regard to" and "with regard to" equal? Can I use them interchangeably? –  korchev Sep 3 '10 at 9:06
    
@korchev: yes, that is right, "in regard to". –  delete Sep 3 '10 at 9:08
add comment

You speak in regard to something or with regard to someone. Examples: In regard to work habits, John puts in too many hours. With regard to Peter, he puts in none.

share|improve this answer
    
Please justify your answer with reference to appropriate sources, otherwise it is no more than your opinion. –  TrevorD Sep 4 '13 at 16:54
add comment

Collins paper back dictionary has 'with regards' as correct. I tend to go with this.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Even when using "with regard to", most people use it incorrectly. Why not avoid this word altogether and say "concerning", "about" or "in the matter of", all perfectly sound and correct. "With regards to" is colloquial and incorrect.

share|improve this answer
add comment

"...in regard to" is the correct terminology.

You "give regards" to someone.

  • English teacher
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.