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I have been using the following phrases but I am still not confident that they are grammatically correct and sound right:

  • "in regards with something"
  • "with regards to something"
  • "regarding something"

I have also heard/read people using an arbitrary combination of the above (e.g. "in regards to"). Are those correct? If yes - are they equivalent or the usage depends on context?

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Related: english.stackexchange.com/questions/320/… –  Jonik Sep 3 '10 at 11:08

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I have been using the following phrases but I am still not confident that they are grammatically correct and sound right:

"in regards with something"

"in regard to" is the right way here.

"with regards to something"

This is OK. Somehow I have the feeling that "with regard to" is more normal though. Paul Brians seems to back this up.

"regarding something"

This is OK, e.g. film title "Regarding Henry", etc.

I have also heard/read people using an arbitrary combination of the above (e.g. "in regards to"). Are those correct? If yes - are they equivalent or the usage depends on context?

It's much easier to answer your question if you put in some examples you've seen. Anyway I hope the above is enough.

Note that there is a completely different usage "regards to" as in "give my regards to old Broadway and tell them I will soon be there" etc.

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Shouldn't it be "in regard to" then? Also are "in regard to" and "with regard to" equal? Can I use them interchangeably? –  korchev Sep 3 '10 at 9:06
    
@korchev: yes, that is right, "in regard to". –  delete Sep 3 '10 at 9:08

You speak in regard to something or with regard to someone. Examples: In regard to work habits, John puts in too many hours. With regard to Peter, he puts in none.

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Please justify your answer with reference to appropriate sources, otherwise it is no more than your opinion. –  TrevorD Sep 4 '13 at 16:54

The only correct terminologies are with regard to, in regard to, regarding, and as regards.

With regards to and in regards to are mere nonstandard variations.

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Collins paper back dictionary has 'with regards' as correct. I tend to go with this.

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Even when using "with regard to", most people use it incorrectly. Why not avoid this word altogether and say "concerning", "about" or "in the matter of", all perfectly sound and correct. "With regards to" is colloquial and incorrect.

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"Regarding" is better than "in regard to".

"About" is absolutely fine and good old plain English - nothing wrong with it. Plain English is good and eminently preferable every time. All too often people try and be clever by using fancy and/or unnecessary words. Just say it how it is.

Awful:

In regards to

With regards to

Fine:

  • About
  • In relation to
  • With regard to
  • In relation to
  • Concerning
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What is the reason that "in regards to" is awful? I just heard it today from the automatic answering machine of the US embassy. –  narengi May 28 at 15:15

"...in regard to" is the correct terminology.

You "give regards" to someone.

  • English teacher
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I use "regarding" or "with respect to". I never use "in regard(s) to" or "with regard(s) to" and in fact cringe every time I hear or read them or any of their variations.

Then again, this is what grammarist.com says:

http://grammarist.com/usage/regard-regards/

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Welcome to EL&U. Please take a moment to review the help center. Answers which consist solely of links or of personal opinion are frowned upon throughout this network of sites; you could improve the answer by posting a relevant excerpt from the link and providing a longer explanation as to why you cringe when you hear variant terms. –  choster Aug 1 at 20:32

protected by Andrew Leach Aug 1 at 20:27

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