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What would be the correct word to use when referring to three or more items, in the same manner as the word both?

For example,

Using two words, with the word both:

"There are several recommendations I have to further improve the sites - both to improve their profit, and decrease their cost."

Using three words, with a blank space in place of the correct word:

"There are several recommendations I have to further improve the sites - _ to improve their profit, decrease their cost and improve their usability."

So, what would be the correct word to use in place of the __?

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

try leash

  1. A set of three.

or tierce

  1. A sequence of three playing cards of the same suit. Tierce of ace, king, queen, is called tierce-major.

the closest "real" adverb I can come up with is "thricely" , so:

There are several recommendations I have to further improve the sites - thricely to improve their profit, decrease their cost and improve their usability.

I wouldn't normally use those words but because you asked .... ;)

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13  
A bit too recondite for the OP's needs, I think: nobody will understand what the hell he's talking about if he uses those. –  Robusto Apr 24 '11 at 0:25
2  
+1 for for using "recondite" :) but it looks like the OP really wanted to be abstruse :) –  Paul Amerigo Pajo Apr 24 '11 at 1:06
2  
I like all three answers...but this one "actually" answers the question, so I'm marking it the correct one. –  Wipqozn Apr 24 '11 at 1:34
1  
@Wipqozn had to look hard for that one ;) it isn't everyday that someone uses the word "recondite" on you so I had to search again! :) I also just realized that there's an adjective form of "tierce" so you could actually coin "tiercely" but that would be too "delphic" haha –  Paul Amerigo Pajo Apr 24 '11 at 1:37
1  
I don't think these suggestions, fill in the blank grammatically at all. –  Mitch Jul 9 '12 at 23:23
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At that point I'd probably pick out one of the list for special attention using "not only ... but":

There are several recommendations I have to further improve the sites, not only to improve their profit, but to decrease their cost and improve their usability.

I'd cut that down further, though:

I have several recommendations to improve the sites — not only to improve their profit, but to decrease their cost and improve their usability.

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I would leave out the word altogether, the second example you give makes perfect sense as it stands:

There are several recommendations I have to further improve the sites; to improve their profit, decrease their cost and improve their usability.

Or, if I'm going to be really picky, and remove the doubling up of the phrase "improve":

There are several recommendations I have to further improve the sites' profit, decrease their costs and improve their usability.
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You don't need a word there at all.

There are several recommendations I have to further improve the sites — to improve their profitability, decrease their cost and improve their usability.

A follow-up suggestion, which you didn't ask for, is to remove the triple repetition of the word "improve".

I propose several recommendations for the sites to raise their profitability, cut their cost, and improve their usability.

Furthermore, a cost decrease generally implies a profit increase, so that may be redundant.

I propose several recommendations for the sites to improve both their profitability and their usability.

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