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How to us possessive apostrophe with words in quotes? For example,

...a few days later I discovered that those five little boys were not that well-behaved (as I firstly thought). In fact they were quite mischievous and conniving. The broken tree next to my house and the cat with its legs tied were all their "inventions". And Lilly, as it later turned out, was able to get to Denver so fast not without those "little inventors'" help.

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You've used it correctly there, but you should consider using the more specialized punctuation marks ', , and to provide some distinction:

And Lilly, as it later turned out, was able to get to Denver so fast not without those “little inventors'” help.

Alternatively, you can avoid the whole problem by using of:

And Lilly, as it later turned out, was able to get to Denver so fast not without the help of those “little inventors”.

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@Mark Trapp - (1) "but you should consider using the more specialized punctuation marks ', “, and ” to provide some distinction" - Where on the keyboard are those quotation marks? The ones that I used are all located on the same key: the one that is "single" (in my question it goes right after letter "s" in the word inventors) is in the low register of the key that is to the left of <Enter> key, the one that is "double" (in my question it is right before the word "little" and right before the space preceding the word "help") is in the same key, except in the upper register (so I need to –  brilliant Apr 18 '11 at 4:38
    
@Mark Trapp - (2) hold down the <Shift> key in order to use it). But where are those "double ones" that you used in your answer? –  brilliant Apr 18 '11 at 4:40
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@brilliant For whatever reason, keyboard makers decided to use the generalized versions, so it's a bit of a bear to get access to them. On a Mac, you can use Option + [ for the left curly quotation mark, Option + Shift + [ for the right one, and Option + Shift + ] to get access to the typographic apostrophe mark. On Windows, it's Alt + 0147, Alt + 0148, and Alt + 0146 respectively. In HTML, its &ldquo;, &rdquo; and &apos;, respectively. –  user2512 Apr 18 '11 at 4:43
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The straight single and double quotes are called typewriter quotes or just straight quotes. The curly ones are ...well, curly or typographer's quotes. I wouldn't recommend using a mixture of the two. It's bad typesetting. However, I do agree that you should probably just avoid the whole issue and rewrite the sentence. –  Sam Apr 18 '11 at 5:08
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@brilliant Although it's largely dependent on the font face, the typographic apostrophe is a distinct glyph from both the straight single quote and the curly right single quote. Mixing straight with curly punctuation would be my third choice after 1) rewriting the sentence and 2) using a font face that has a distinct typographic apostrophe. –  user2512 Apr 18 '11 at 5:42
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