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Which is correct: shot or shooted? Where and when is the form shooted used?

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Related: “Troubleshooted” or “troubleshot”? –  RegDwigнt Apr 16 '11 at 19:01
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I've never come across shooted as a past participle in the transitive form. He shooted the gun sounds like baby-talk to me. But I've no problem with saying *My bean sprouts have shooted", for example. –  FumbleFingers Apr 16 '11 at 19:38
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Shooted is an obsolete, nonstandard simple past tense and past participle of shoot. (source)

You should not use this form. Shot is proper.

It's still used sometimes, but it's really obsolete. Example:

He took his gun and shooted people just like, from one block of LePlaza and two blocks from the main police station of PAP.

The Huffington Post, “Georgianne Nienaber: Senator Leahy Calls for Freeze on Haiti Aid, Clinton Silent, Palin Visits Camps”

It's also common to use shooted when asking:

Have you ever shooted a gun?

Although it's also improper and the correct term is "Have you ever shot a gun?"

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It's also common to use shooted when asking: where did you find it? –  qweqwe Apr 16 '11 at 19:35
    
what do you mean? –  RiMMER Apr 16 '11 at 19:40
    
how do you know "It's also common to use shooted when asking: Have you ever shooted a gun?" –  qweqwe Apr 16 '11 at 19:42
    
I've just heard people use it once in a while :) still, it doesn't make it proper in any way and you should avoid it unless you have a perfectly good reason to form it like that. –  RiMMER Apr 16 '11 at 19:45
    
u mean "perfectly good reason" as mentioned above? (about shooting sprouts) LOL –  qweqwe Apr 16 '11 at 19:51
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Shot is the correct past tense of shoot. Shot is also a noun referring to the firing of a gun or the projectile that is blasted out of one.

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do you mean that this is THE ONLY right varient? no exceptions? what about these en.wikipedia.org/w/… –  qweqwe Apr 16 '11 at 18:44
    
    
@qweqwe: Truly, the Intertubes are a seething cauldron of slang and bad English. –  RedGrittyBrick Apr 17 '11 at 8:59
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@qweqwe: The only legitimate way to use "shooted" is in its nominal meaning of "having shoots" as a plant has shoots. The valid Wikipedia uses you link to refer to things like "green-shoooted plants" and the like. There are misuses of past tense as there well. Wikipedia is not without its share of mistakes in fact and English, in case you weren't aware. –  Robusto Apr 17 '11 at 10:01
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It's related to usage.

Shooted is used when speaking of plants sending out shoots (My lilies have shooted). It's usually intransitive.

Shot is used in most other contexts. It can be transitive (I shot the sheriff) or intransitive (The kids shot out of class as soon as the bell rang).

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If can add a comment to my own post, all the intransitive uses of shot that I can think of require a preposition after the verb, making shot into a phrasal verb eg shot out, shot away, etc. –  veejay May 29 '12 at 13:16
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protected by Clark Kent May 29 '12 at 13:12

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