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Can someone please give a clear definition and distinction of these terms, as when a public figure is asked a difficult question and says: "I'll take that on notice" or "I'll take that under advisement."

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2 Answers 2

Let me answer your second question first

take something under advisement reserve judgment while considering something.

It's usually used by a judge when he announces he is going to consider what counsel has said and rule on it later.

As for "I'll take that on notice," I haven't heard that used. Usually the term is to "put someone on notice" meaning to alert someone to a fact and to the fact that you have given them some kind of ultimatum:

The police put Niko Bellic on notice that no further racketeering would be tolerated in Liberty City.

It's a way of telling someone "You have been warned."

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+1 Good answer. Putting someone formally "on notice" for acting in violation removes their option to plead ignorance should they re-offend later. –  Snubian Apr 12 '11 at 1:47
    
I think "take on notice" might be an Australianism. It is definitely used here in the OP context. –  trideceth12 Apr 12 '11 at 8:41

"As for "I'll take that on notice," I haven't heard that used" Just today I have heard it used by a seasoned American civil engineer and constructor as he warned a supervisor of poor crew management. So please feel free.

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