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Which word you would choose as a superlative of "wrong"?

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presumably the existence of such a word isn't particularly logical? like a superlative of "true", or "pregnant"? –  Mitch Apr 9 '11 at 14:18
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@Mitch: I've never understood why people think "pregnant" can't have comparatives. Someone whose baby is 3 weeks overdue is way more pregnant than someone who just peed on a stick. –  Marthaª Apr 9 '11 at 14:47
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@Martha: truer words were never spoken! –  PLL Apr 9 '11 at 16:35
    
@Marthaª - I think the concept of "being more pregnant", if such, would be just as different from "being pregnant for a longer time" as "being alive" is different from "being older". –  brilliant 10 hours ago
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4 Answers

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The word that comes to my mind is irrational. An answer to an objective question may show solid reasoning but an incorrect conclusion or result due to incomplete information or some logical error. An answer that lacks reason or context, in that sense, might be deemed wrong in this more profound way.

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Webster's Third New International Dictionary gives wrongest as the superlative of wrong.

EDIT FOR OP WHO ACTUALLY WANTED MY OPINION ON SOMETHING

Yes, you knew it had to happen, that I would eventually be forced to step out from behind my adamantine wall of dictionary citations

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and render an actual (pause for a gasp)

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opinion or preference in which I had to abandon all pretense of objectivity

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(and it is a pretense) and simply say what I would do in this case. Now, before you start ringing me up and asking for WWRD bracelets, I have to warn you that my opinions, although as close to fact as humans can possibly get, are still just that: opinions. And so, without further ado I shall state that the word I personally would use as the superlative form of wrong is, in fact, not a word but an image

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but (heh hehe) since this is English Language & Usage and not Non-Verbal Semiotics 101, I will render the image in words. Soooo ... when someone is totally, completely, 100% wrong, the wrongest state of wrongness that can ever be achieved plus one, I would simply say

You've got your head so far up your ass you can see out your belly button.

And I would leave the field triumphant, adored by the women, admired by the men, but keeping my hand on my car keys in case I needed to make a quick getaway in order to avoid bloodshed (mine).

Hey, you asked.

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And if you don't like wrongest, there's always most wrong... –  psmears Apr 9 '11 at 14:52
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@brilliant: OK to clarify... without any further context, I would choose most wrong; from his answer, I'm assuming Robusto would choose wrongest (though I'm sure he'll put me right if not ;-). Both are 100% correct. In many contexts I would choose another word as being more appropriate (either in meaning, or sound, or rhythm, etc.) - but if you're not going to give us more information on the specific context, then I don't see how we can be a lot more helpful... –  psmears Apr 9 '11 at 16:10
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@Robusto: Now I want a WWRD bracelet! Where can I get it? –  PLL Apr 9 '11 at 16:33
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@brilliant: The word I would usually use is based, ipso facto, on my opinion, and I have given it. –  Robusto Apr 9 '11 at 16:38
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Um. Wow. THWACK!, but wow. –  Marthaª Apr 9 '11 at 17:14
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In physics we tend to like "not even wrong" after a Pauli quip.

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Wrongest (as others here have suggested) is good; worst is also possible.

In fact, though it is slightly less specific about the nature of the problem, worst is actually the more idiomatic superlative in some situations. In my opinion, wrongest is usually best reserved for failures that involve a moral dimension.

Compare the following:

"That's the worst possible advice you could have given your sister". [Her sister gave Mary some bad fashion advice]

*"That's the wrongest possible advice you could have given your sister". [Her sister gave Mary some bad fashion advice]

"That's the worst possible advice you could have given Mary". [Her sister recommended that Mary should lie to her boyfriend about her HIV status]

"That's the wrongest possible advice you could have given Mary". [Her sister recommended that Mary should lie to her boyfriend about her HIV status]

Among the numerous errors he had committed, electrocuting his grandmother was undeniably the worst of them all. [The action was bad, but its questionable morality was not necessarily the most important contributor to its badness]

Among the numerous errors he had committed, electrocuting his grandmother was undeniably the wrongest of them all. [Morally, the action was extremely reprehensible]

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