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The activity we engaged in was good for she and I.

or

The activity we engaged in was good for us both.

or

The activity we engaged in was good for her and me.

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3 Answers 3

Prepositions in standard English take the prepositional (objective) case.

The activity we engaged in was for her and me.

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+1. But just a cautionary note to readers not to confuse preposition "for" with conjunction "for": I bought food for us to eat, but I bought food, for I was hungry :-) –  psmears Apr 6 '11 at 21:24

"Her and me" or "both of us", but not "she and I".

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A good rule of thumb is to omit each pronoun in turn and see what fits

The activity we engaged in was good for her

and

The activity we engaged in was good for me

hence

The activity we engaged in was good for her and me.

though

The activity we engaged in was good for us.

can sometimes be used (where "us" is unambiguous) to avoid the problem.

or

The activity she and I engaged in was good for us.

(because "I engaged in an activity" and "she engaged in an activity")

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