Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it right to use the word crippled as a verb with the sense disabled/unable to do things?

An example sentence:

I am crippled to complete my tasks as I didn't receive the credentials.

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Canis Lupus, Josh61, Edwin Ashworth, choster, Ronan Aug 26 at 8:45

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions that can be answered using commonly-available references are off-topic. A list of these references can be found here: List of general references" – Canis Lupus, Josh61, Edwin Ashworth, choster, Ronan
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Have you tried looking up "am crippled to" on the internet, then looking to see how many of the first 100 say returns are followed by an infinitive? –  Edwin Ashworth Aug 25 at 6:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, you can use crippled as a verb.

Per M-W:

Cripple transitive verb

To deprive of the use of a limb and especially a leg: the accident left him crippled

To deprive of capability for service or of strength, efficiency, or wholeness : an economy crippled by inflation

Also, from thefreedictionary.com:

This measure crippled our efforts

The accident has crippled her for life

However, I don't think crippled to fits as-is in your sentence. You're better off using words like unable, or hindered.

I am unable to complete my tasks as I didn't receive the credentials.

share|improve this answer
    
The efforts can be crippled and the person can be crippled but someone is not crippled to do something. So yes you can use it as a verb, but not in the sentence proposed by OP –  mplungjan Aug 25 at 7:22

That would not be idiomatic English.

Efforts can be crippled and a person can be crippled but someone is not crippled to do something unless that person is disabled (too crippled to perform his tasks because of lack of fingers).

I suggest

I am blocked from completing my tasks

or to use your word

My ability to complete my tasks is crippled by the lack of credentials

share|improve this answer

I crippled, he crippled, they crippled. I cripple, he cripples, they cripple.

His lack of credentials crippled his efforts

share|improve this answer
    
I already mentioned that Efforts can be crippled –  mplungjan Aug 25 at 11:25

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.