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What does this sentence mean:

"I am supposed to be having my physics class in the science building."

Also, what is the difference between this sentence and

"I am supposed to have my physics class...."?

What should be inferred from the use of a progressive tense?

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See also English Language Learners Good Luck. –  Kris Aug 16 at 6:21

1 Answer 1

You should save money. (time is not specified) You should be saving money (now). (time is specified)

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Welcome to ELU.SE. The system has determined this is a low-quality answer, probably because of wayward punctuation. Please take a moment to find upvoted answers to see the type of answer this site is looking for. We also provide help on answering questions. Answers should ideally include some sort of independent corroboration, correctly referenced. It is also far better to address the examples in the question, or at least to explain how your answer relates to the question. –  Andrew Leach Aug 16 at 8:24
    
Though your answer points to the truth. However, the concept of 'now' is polysemous. "I am supposed to be having my physics class in the science building" could refer to the 'now' meaning 'at this very moment' or the 'nows' meaning 'this coming / this term'. "I have to go, I am supposed to be having my physics class in the science building." / "I am supposed to be having my physics class in the science building next year." –  Edwin Ashworth Aug 16 at 8:34

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