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Is there a single word or phrase that means a group of very similar photos, such as when a photographer takes a burst of 7-8 shots with the hope of catching the right instant, or to get the best focus?

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5 Answers 5

I think you are referring to a sequence of photos:

  • Sequence photography is the technique of combining different shots of the same subject to present its course of action in a final single image. Capturing a subject in motion will provide you with images which, basically, have the subject at different moments of its movement throughout the frame, usually with the same background (in the case of the most popular type, where the camera is fixed but the subject moves).

Source:http://www.photopoly.net/how-to-create-sequence-photos/

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good one .. that's what you'd say on a shoot, etc. (Indeed you'd just say "this burst ..." if you were referring to them while editing or whatever. but I suppose that's a sequence, if for some reason you don't want to say burst.) Here's the original burst photographer! en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Étienne-Jules_Marey –  Joe Blow Aug 15 at 10:51
    
My first thought was set, which is along these lines. –  myLifeisanAbyss Aug 15 at 12:38
    
Your answer sounds right but your link describes and depicts something quite different than what the OP asked for. The picture in your link shows a single background and multiple images of a skier (or snowboarder) splayed across that single background. The OP's question is asking for the technique where multiple pictures are taken "with the hope of catching the right instant, or to get the best focus" –  Kristina Lopez Aug 15 at 21:45
    
@KristinaLopez - The picture with the single background and multiple images is actually a representation of a sequence of photos as described in the text. The sequence is in just one picture to obtain a stronger effect. But it is just the photo technique OP is referring to. –  Josh61 Aug 15 at 22:25
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Works for me Josh! +1 –  Kristina Lopez Aug 15 at 22:42

a burst of 7-8 shots

“Burst” is the correct term of art. You’ll see some cameras have a feature called “burst mode.” Instead of shooting just one shot of one setup, you shoot a burst of shots of one setup, and then later pick the best out of the burst. A burst of 7–8 shots might be taken in only 1–2 seconds. Instead of tapping the shutter just once for a single photograph, the photographer holds it down just once and shoots a burst.

A “sequence” is bigger than a burst. A sequence implies each photo had some thought behind it. A sequence of 7–8 shots might be taken over 15–30 seconds.

Larger than that would be a “gallery” — a gallery of 7–8 shots might be taken over the course of an hour or a day.

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right - if he literally means a sequence which is a burst, then it's a burst. (I guess a bracketed burst, as Erik mentions, is also a burst.) i feel FWIW you wouldn't use "gallery", you'd indeed just refer to the "shoot" for the overall, well, shoot: everything taken on one day. –  Joe Blow Aug 15 at 10:54

Burst or Continuous Shooting

From Digital Photography Review:

Burst or Continuous Shooting mode is the digital camera's ability to take several shots immediately one after another, similar to a film SLR camera with a motorwind.

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Photographers often bracket their shots to maximize their likelihood of obtaining the optimal exposure:

transitive verb

4 c : to take photographs of at more than one exposure in order to ensure that the desired exposure is obtained

The related noun is also bracket:

4 : a section of a continuously numbered or graded series (as age ranges or income levels)

(Definitions from Merriam-Webster.com)

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Compendium might be what you're looking for:

a collection of things, esp. one systematically gathered

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