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I come across this sentence : "I'm a long-time Dropbox user, but it's never been a perfect solution for me. Despite its developers' best efforts, Dropbox has never really gained complete integration with either my Mac or iOS workflow: It's always felt grafted on. I'm excited about iCloud Drive for exactly that reason — instead of a product, it really is a feature. And a useful one at that."

Source : http://www.imore.com/os-x-yosemite-cloud-drive-explained

What is the author trying to express when he say "It's always felt grafted on"? Does he mean that he is not getting a perfect solution?

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2 Answers 2

It is the following expression used in a figurative way by the author to express the concept that in his opinion 'Dropbox' never really gained complete integration with other operating systems but it has always been (felt) like a sort of 'artificial/non natural' ( probably somehow forced) implementation on them.

Graft something on(to) something and graft something on:

to splice a living part onto another living part:

  • The gardener grafted a red rose onto the stem of another species. The gardener grafted on a red rose.

Source:http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/graft+on

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Note that it is "grafted on" (with an "f"), not "grated on." Graft means "a piece of living tissue that is planted surgically" (e.g. a skin graft, or grafts inserted on the stem of a tree.). However, the phrase is often used out of the biological context as it is the case in your example. In your example, what the author meant to say is that DropBox does not integrate well with the iOS. That is to say, it does not feel like a natural part of the iOS, but it rather feels like some artifical feature that does not fit well with the rest of the operating system.

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