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Example:

She decided to come to the party even though her friends cancelled.

Or is there a more appropiate word/phrase for this case?

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1  
Cancelled is perfect. Another option is "backed out", which is less formal than "cancelled". –  Dan Bron Aug 3 at 13:55
    
@DanBron Oh thanks, I think I was thinking of backed out. –  janoChen Aug 3 at 13:56
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Did you check this online thesaurus entry for cancel? It includes not merely back out but also things like beg off and renege. –  tchrist Aug 3 at 14:00
    
Cancelled implies that they had indicated they would be coming, and then had to let someone know they would now not be coming. You could just say wouldn't be there, or had declined the invitation if that's more appropriate. –  Neil Aug 3 at 16:46
    
Yes, you would only use 'cancel' if they had earlier accepted then changed their minds. Even then there are probably better words, as others have indicated. If the friends never accepted in the first place, a more appropriate word would be 'declined'. –  WS2 Aug 3 at 17:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you were invited to a party and decided not to attend, you would decline the invitation.

If you accepted the invitation and later decided not to attend, you would cancel your acceptance.

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I think both "decline" and "cancel" imply that you tell the host about it. –  gnasher729 Aug 3 at 21:33

There are different ways to say this, depending on the precise meaning. You just said "not attending". Depending on what happened, any of the following and probably others could be correct:

  1. She decided to come to the party even though her friends were not invited.
  2. She decided to come to the party even though her friends ignored the invitation.
  3. She decided to come to the party even though her friends declined the invitation.
  4. She decided to come to the party even though her friends cancelled the invitation.
  5. She decided to come to the party even though her friends decided not to turn up.
  6. She decided to come to the party even though her friends were prevented to come by an accident.
  7. She decided to come to the party even though her friends gave up their plan to gate-crash the party.
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