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I want to find a word that basically means to miss, where miss is in the sense of “feel for the loss or absence of”. But I am looking for a more spiritual word. I came up with to dream for or reminisce but both don’t really fulfil what I am looking for. I am looking for a stronger word that is synonymous with miss but is more spiritual.

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Miss in the sense of 'feel for the loss or absence of'? Better include that in the question for clarity. –  Kris Jul 8 at 6:51
    
Your question explains nothing. You wrote 1000s of words but did not simply state, what you are talking about? Just click edit and simply state what you are talking about, what the general field is. What is it you miss? –  Joe Blow Jul 8 at 8:13
    
@JoeBlow 1000 words? talk about exaggeration. Anyway sorry if the question was unclear I will try to edit it to suit the rubric better. –  armoose Jul 8 at 10:53
    
@Kris Thanks I used that in the edit –  armoose Jul 8 at 10:55
    
Sometimes there are specific single words that capture everything you want about a concept. Sometime not. Don't get hung up on having a single word. None of the words so far have any connotation of 'spiritual' to them. You can always say 'spiritual longing'. –  Mitch Jul 8 at 12:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Probably a longing may fit your contest:

  • strong, persistent desire or craving, esp. for something unattainable or distant: filled with longing for home.

  • an instance of this: a sudden longing to see old friends.

  • A longing is a strong feeling of need or desire for someone or something. If you're stuck in detention and all of your friends are outside enjoying a sunny day, you might be looking out the window with longing.

Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/longing/http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/longing

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I like "yearning" in this context. It has the right spiritual note you are yearning for!

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  568ml Jul 8 at 8:37
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@568ml: How does this not answer the question? –  Rahul Narain Jul 8 at 10:57
    
@RahulNarain it struck me as something more suited to a comment, and so I flagged it as such. No definition was provided, and there's an assertion of a particular connotation without any substantiation. –  568ml Jul 9 at 7:20

The term ache, as defined by the American Heritage Dictionary, can mean

To yearn painfully: refugees who ached for their homeland.

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