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this is a poem by James. D. Corrothers:

To be a Negro on a day like this
Demands forgiveness.
Bruised with blow on blow,
Betrayed, like him whose woe dimmed eyes gave bliss,
Still must one succor those who brought one low,
To be a Negro on a day like this

To be a Negro on a day like this
Demands rare patience—patience that can wait
In utter darkness. 'Tis the path to miss,
And knock, unheeded, at iron gate,
To be a Negro on a day like this

To be a Negro on a day like this
Demands strange loyalty, we served a flag
Which is to us white freedom's emphasis.
Ah! One must love when Truth and Justice lag,
To be a Negro on a day like this

To be a Negro on a day like this
Alas! Lord God, what evil have we done?
Still shines the gate, all gold and amethyst,
But I pass by, the glorious goal unwon,
"Merely a Negro"—on a day like this!!!!!!"

what does "demands forgiveness" mean? i have problem in comprehension.

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closed as off-topic by tchrist, Josh61, Robusto, FumbleFingers, Mitch Jul 5 at 16:05

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Can we have a little more context? On a day like what? –  Kristina Lopez Jul 3 at 21:56
    
yeah, I put whole poem. –  user77755 Jul 3 at 22:01
1  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about interpreting poetry –  FumbleFingers Jul 5 at 16:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

"Demands" in this case should be read as "Requires"

In stanza 1, to forgive those to harm you

In stanza 2, to wait patiently

In stanza 3, to be loyal to a flag that isn't totally supporting freedom.

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