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The teams weren't fair to begin with, but Jim's injury made them that much less fair.

The last part of that sentence feels wrong to me due to the contrast of "much" and "less". Is there perhaps a more natural sounding alternative to convey the same meaning without rephrasing the sentence entirely?

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Sounds fine to me, [being -> begin aside]. You can replace that much with even however. –  Orbling Mar 24 '11 at 1:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  • all the more unfair
  • even worse
  • that much more unbalanced
  • more unfair still

They still feel kind of awkward though.

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I don't know if this is considered rephrasing, but I think the culprit is the weak verb "made":

The teams weren't fair to begin with, but Jim's injury exposed their treachery.

or

The teams weren't fair to begin with, but Jim's injury brought them to a new low.

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You could try

The teams weren't fair to begin with, but Jim's injury made them still less fair.

or, to avoid repeating fair:

The teams weren't equal to begin with, but Jim's injury made them still less fair.

or even

The teams weren't equal to begin with, but Jim's injury made them unfairer still.

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