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  1. Would you mind arranging to travel with us
  2. Would you mind to arrange travelling with us
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marked as duplicate by Elian, FumbleFingers, Edwin Ashworth, RegDwigнt Jun 8 at 16:04

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Both require question marks, since they are syntactically questions. (2) is ungrammatical; mind does not take an infinitive complement like to arrange.. (1) is grammatical but not colloquial; there are three clauses, with 4 verbs, in just 8 words; that's a processing overload. Probly an American travel agent would say something like Would you mind arranging your travel with us? –  John Lawler Jun 8 at 14:50

1 Answer 1

The stem Would you mind takes a gerund; furthermore, the verb arrange, when followed by a verbal, takes an infinitive. So as far as grammaticalness goes, the first sentence is the correct one. (If you're looking for a difference in meaning, I don't think there is any: The second one would probably be interpreted the same way, even if it is nonstandard.)

If the meaning is supposed to be

Hey, why don't you come with us?

then the first sentence sounds maybe a little too indirect/polite to me. I guess it's the contrast of "Hey, why don't you travel with us? We can sit together on the train and eat together and everything!" and "I'm going to be really indirect and subjunctive and stuff when I'm asking".

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