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Doesn't have to be "always", could also just be someone who shows a lot of pity for people around him. Could also be that some people may not always show it, but do feel very inclined most of the time to feel pity for others.

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1 Answer 1

em·pa·thy
n.

  1. Identification with and understanding of another's situation, feelings, and motives. See Synonyms at pity.
  2. The attribution of one's own feelings to an object.

[en- + -pathy (translation of German Einfühlung).]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

n

  1. the power of understanding and imaginatively entering into another person's feelings. See also identification
  2. the attribution to an object, such as a work of art, of one's own emotional or intellectual feelings about it

[from Greek empatheia affection, passion, intended as a rendering of German Einfühlung, literally: a feeling in;]

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 200


com·pas·sion
n.
Deep awareness of the suffering of another coupled with the wish to relieve it. See Synonyms at pity.

[Middle English compassioun, from Late Latin compassiō, compassiōn-, from compassus, past participle of compatī, to sympathize : Latin com-, com- + Latin patī, to suffer; see pē(i)- in Indo-European roots.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

n
a feeling of distress and pity for the suffering or misfortune of another, often including the desire to alleviate it
[C14: from Old French, from Late Latin compassiō fellow feeling, from compatī to suffer with, from Latin com- with + patī to bear, suffer]

Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003

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+1 for empathic –  Preston Fitzgerald May 27 at 9:48

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