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One word for the above question. No matter what new situation, person or experience is encountered this person feels overwhelmed by sensory overload perhaps. He isn't scared though, just can't deal with so many new impressions at the same time. It overloads the brain.

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Credulous.....? –  WS2 May 22 at 20:46
    
Related. –  tchrist Jun 7 at 20:34

4 Answers 4

How about neophobia?

Extreme or irrational fear or dislike of anything new, novel, or unfamiliar.

So the word to describe the person would be neophobe.

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Please cite your source when providing a definition. And per meta.english.stackexchange.com/a/4722, please β€˜never’ use πš–πš˜πš—πš˜πšœπš™πšŠπšŒπšŽπš 𝚝𝚎𝚑𝚝 or Λ‹backticksΛ‹ on ELU. –  tchrist Jul 4 at 7:41

One phrase, coined by Dr. Elaine N. Aron in 1996, is Highly Sensitive Person (HSP), which is used to refer to the affected person in a positive sense, and is considered to be different from many negative traits such as shyness or timidity, anxieties, phobias and fears:

[Highly sensitive persons] may process sensory data much more deeply and thoroughly due to a biological difference in their nervous systems. This is a specific trait, with key consequences for how we view people, that in the past has often been confused with innate shyness, social anxiety problems, inhibitedness, social phobia and innate fearfulness, and introversion.

More, from Dr. Aron can be found here, including this attribute (among others):

You are also more easily overwhelmed. If you notice everything, you are naturally going to be overstimulated when things are too intense, complex, chaotic, or novel for a long time.

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nonadaptive

: not serving to adapt the individual to the environment

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Please no not just provide a link to some source: explicitly state the origin of the text that you are quoting. Also, we’re looking for substantive answers that provide some explanation and context beyond a mere cut-and-paste from some online dictionary. So please don't just give a one-line answer; explain why your answer is right, ideally with explicit citations supporting that reasoning. –  tchrist Jul 4 at 7:44

Depending on the context, you may be looking for timid:

showing a lack of courage or confidence, easily frightened

Lacking courage is a common reason why people won’t try new things, meet new people, or go to new places.

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Please cite your source when providing a definition. And per meta.english.stackexchange.com/a/4722, please β€˜never’ use πš–πš˜πš—πš˜πšœπš™πšŠπšŒπšŽπš 𝚝𝚎𝚑𝚝 or Λ‹backticksΛ‹ on ELU. –  tchrist Jul 4 at 7:41

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