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What is that loop you hold on to when you ride a bus/subway?

Is it called a loop of some sort? Or handle? In the picture below, an invisible... ?

enter image description here

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3  
You mean straps? –  tchrist May 16 '14 at 4:32
2  
Yes, straps. One who holds on to them is called a straphanger. –  John Lawler May 16 '14 at 4:35
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In Jaguar cars, the strap above the door is referred to in the owners manual as a Dowager strap. (circa 1986) –  Frank May 16 '14 at 4:48
    
@Frank Seems Jaguar is the only one that calls them so (for some unknown but very interesting reason). –  Kris May 16 '14 at 13:47
1  
@ErikKowal Excuse me, I'll have you know I rarely had a dowager in the back seat of my Jag, but when the occasion arose those straps sure kept them secure. ;) –  Frank May 16 '14 at 17:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Bus-strap

enter image description here
"Here is a bus driver grabbing onto typical straps"

Grab/ Grab Handle

enter image description here
"City Bus Plastic Grab Handle"

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Bus straps are used on the subway?? –  RyeɃreḁd May 16 '14 at 14:04
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"Strap" is by-far the most common term used in New York, to the point that the community activists supporting users of NYC's public transportation are known as the Straphangers. –  KRyan May 16 '14 at 14:10
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That guy is enjoying the straps way too much. –  Albzi May 16 '14 at 14:28
    
@KRyan: But is "straps" the most common term because the community activists are known as "the Straphangers", or the other way around? –  Peter Shor May 16 '14 at 21:51

The standing passenger has his own page.

hanging strap: a strap suspended from the ceiling with a handle provided for standing passengers to hold on to

handrails: running horizontally along the ceiling

stanchions: vertical poles

grab rails: smaller hand rails attached to seats, doors and doorways

And whether it is a train, subway car, bus, or car I would probably just call them oh-shit handles.

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In the Enchanted Typewriter the kings and queens come from Hades and they were having a ball in a trolley car. The author calls them straps as well. NB: I just commented on the wrong comment. Sorry about that. –  Tucker May 16 '14 at 6:07
    
I've got a concern with this Wikipedia page. Is handrail really only a horizontal bar? Can't I call a vertical one a handrail? I'm also not sure about this stanchion term. When you look it up on Google Images, you won't find any images with long bars used to hold on to. –  jFrenetic Aug 2 at 22:56

It is called a handgrip in some cities, but the terms bus handle, bus pull handle, bus pull ring, city bus handle are also in use.

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The pull handles and pull rings are different things. These signal the driver that a passenger wants off at the next stop. –  Oldcat May 16 '14 at 16:44
    
@ Oldcat, I thought so too but It was included in the term search 'bus handle' –  Third News May 16 '14 at 16:56

protected by tchrist Jul 16 '14 at 16:03

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