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In a conversation, which of the two sentences below is grammatically correct?

There was a party celebrating for my sister's marriage.

There was a party which was being celebrated for my sister's marriage.

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closed as off-topic by Kris, Mari-Lou A, medica, Edwin Ashworth, choster May 13 at 12:52

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This question is better asked on English Language Learners –  Kris May 13 at 5:36
    
@Kris If you have any objection, i will remove it by today evening. –  user72862 May 13 at 6:11
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Why is there always this assumption that because there are two sentences to choose from, one has to be correct? Very often both examples are wrong, or are begging to be reworded. The preposition for works if it precedes the noun phrase: There was a party for my sister's marriage/wedding OR There was a party to celebrate my sister's marriage/wedding –  Mari-Lou A May 13 at 6:22
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@Mari-Lou A party was being celebrated there. and you mean to say that we should not use those sentence. if you are right, please give me answer. –  user72862 May 13 at 6:28
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As a sentence "There was a party which was being celebrated for my sister's marriage" is a bit awkward, you don't normally celebrate a party, you celebrate an occasion (e.g. a birthday) with a party. Both your examples are a bit awkward, although understandable. –  Mari-Lou A May 13 at 6:39

3 Answers 3

The following sentence would be better.

There was a party celebrating my sister's marriage.

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Both are wrong

There was a party celebrating for my sister's marriage.

This is grammatically incorrect. You celebrate an event. You do not celebrate for an event.

There was a party which was being celebrated for my sister's marriage.

This is incorrect (or at least very unlikely). What is being celebrated is the marriage. The first part of this sentence makes it seem that the event which you are celebrating is the party itself. A party is a type of celebration. You don't usually celebrate a celebration.

If you are recording a past event you might write

There was a party celebrating my sister's marriage

or, somewhat more passively,

There was a party in celebration of my sister's marriage.

or

There was a party to celebrate my sister's marriage.
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Out of the two choices, I agree with @Jason Chen. However, I would rewrite the sentence completely:

We [he/she/they] celebrated my sister's marriage with a party.

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