Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For example, I have a database and several tables in it. One of the tables is named Clients for this example. When I speak about a table and need to mention its name do I have to use the definite article?

Insert a record into the Clients table.

or

Insert a record into Clients table.

Which one is correct?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would go with either

Insert a record into the Clients table.

or

Insert a record into Clients.

In most of my professional writing I would prefer the first option, although the second may be better in some cases for style reasons.

"Insert a record into Clients table" would not be correct, because "Clients" is a modifier to the subject "table" in this sentence, and not a proper noun.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You would say:

Insert a record into the Clients table.

This is equivalent to

Insert a record into the table named Clients.

If it was unambiguous from the context that you meant the table, you could say

Insert a record into Clients.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.