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The closest question searching found was Connotatively neutral alternatives to "ignorant"? which doesn't really help me.

I'm trying to find synonyms for the word "Ignore" that don't change the meaning pretty drastically. Looking on http://thesaurus.com/browse/ignore pulls up the following as the top choice:

Avoid

But in context this don't seem accurate to me, take:

I ignored the dog while I was walking.

I avoided the dog while I was walking.

One has a certain active feeling to it. I actively avoided the dog. Ignore is much more passive. By definition:

Ignore: refuse to take notice of or acknowledge

Avoid: keep away from or stop oneself from doing

Which confirms the idea. Ignore is without notice or acknowledgement. Avoid must have noticed or acknowledged to then keep away from.

So, the question is what would a better synonym be for Ignore that keeps the passive nature?

For the sake of question what I plan to use it for is along the lines of:

Unlike RF Tags, our advanced laser system ignores all RFI.

Our advanced laser system was developed to ignore all duplicate tags.

You can quickly see that Avoid doesn't work:

Unlike RF Tags, our advanced laser system avoids all RFI.

Our advanced laser system was developed to avoid all duplicate tags.

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A negative of the phrase pay attention to has pretty much the same connotations: I paid no attention/I didn't pay any attention to the dog. Neither is of course grammatically Passive; I'm presuming you mean the emotional connotation of avoiding involvement. –  John Lawler May 7 at 20:05
    
I could write hundreds of sentences that mean the same thing, I'm looking for a one word synonym though. I apologize if that wasn't clear in the question. –  Ryan May 7 at 20:11
2  
There isn't always a single word available that has the right syntax, the right denotation, and the right connotations. English only has so many words. –  John Lawler May 7 at 20:13
    
Avoid seems to fit you first situation. Your system avoids the problems of RF interference. I'm not sure what the function of avoiding/ignoring duplicates would entail so I can't tell what would be better. –  Matt Эллен May 9 at 9:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As answer to your question, I offer disregard.

But for your specific usage with a radio antenna, I don't think you are on the right track at all. I should want to say The new antenna minimizes (radio) interference (or leakage, or noise). Antennas may also filter out interfering signals. Whether the mechanism is directionality or frequency selectivity might also affect the wording I would choose. Reject is another common verb you will find applied to noise and interference in descriptions of signal processing systems, e.g. a band-reject filter.

Finally, when you are dealing with completely different forms of energy: e.g. optical vs mechanical, you can say it is immune.

Unlike RF Tags, our advanced laser system is immune to RFI. Also, our system was developed to disregard all duplicate tags.

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It has nothing to do with an antenna, I used that solely for example to avoid getting into more industry specific terminology. I'll edit the question for you. –  Ryan May 7 at 20:08
    
@Ryan: For your new usage, I'd go with rejects RFI or resists RFI. Although the common English usage of reject is active, in technical usage it means dulling the effect of some other active element. –  Ben Voigt May 7 at 20:17
    
hmm reject might be an option for the "Rejects duplicates" thanks. I don't think it works at all for "Rejects RFI" though, its still far too active. We don't dull the effect or lessen it. We have nothing to do with radio frequency at all. –  Ryan May 7 at 20:22
    
@Ryan: Every electrical system is susceptible to RFI unless shielded against it. Your transmission modality is optical, orthogonal to radio (well, really it just operates in a different band of the EM spectrum), but RFI can still affect electronics. But you can say that your transmission is immune to RFI. –  Ben Voigt May 7 at 20:24
    
just looked up synonyms for rejects though and found dismiss. That might be the best option. –  Ryan May 7 at 20:27

Consider:

I paid no attention to the dog while I was walking.

Unlike RF Tags, our advanced laser system disregards all RFI.

Our advanced laser system was developed to disregard all duplicate tags.

share|improve this answer
    
To an electronics engineer, the second sentence is not at all passive. The third sentence also describes an active feature, but that is most likely accurate. But your third sentence is exactly the phrase I used in my answer 6 hours earlier. –  Ben Voigt May 8 at 13:16

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discard

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