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The context is:

The police, [appropriately so], are subject to a high level of scrutiny.

Are there any other terms I can use here?

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1  
The use of commas with brackets is clumsy at best. The police are subject to a high level of scrutiny (and appropriately so). –  Edwin Ashworth May 1 at 22:57
    
@EdwinAshworth - The use of square brackets here is to show that this is the term that I'm wanting to replace. –  dwjohnston May 1 at 23:06
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It's non-conventional (check here and certainly misled me. Italics and a reference ('Are there any other terms I can use in place of the italicised string?') would clarify. –  Edwin Ashworth May 2 at 8:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The police are rightly subject to a high level of scrutiny (also note missing article has been added)

rightly - in accordance with justice or what is morally right

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Thaks, that's a typo. It's amusing that two of the answers have reproduced it. –  dwjohnston May 2 at 8:13

The police, fittingly so, are subject to high level of scrutiny.

My edit: Fittingly, The police are subject to high level of scrutiny.

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The police are subject to a high level of scrutiny -- and rightfully so.

rightful: according to the law; proper or appropriate.

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The wording would be less awkward if the sentence was not unnecessarily interrupted by the parenthetical clause. Placing it at the end would greatly improve both the flow and the rhetorical impact: "The police are subject to a high level of scrutiny -- [and] rightfully so". –  Erik Kowal May 2 at 8:46

The police are deservedly subject to a high level of scrutiny. Justly would also fit.

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"as it ought to be" would fit. It is a common adverbial phrase. ("it" can be replaced with "he", "she", "they" depending on the context)

ought to
1 used to say what is the right thing to do
2 used to say what you expect or would like to happen

The police are, as they ought to be, subject to high level of scrutiny.

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No. This is definitely non-standard. I'll reluctantly concede "The police are subject to a high level of scrutiny (as they ought to be)". –  Erik Kowal May 2 at 8:43
    
@Erik: I do not think it is non-standard. I see this usage in serious publication and articles. It can be rephrases also. The police are, as they ought to be, ... –  ermanen May 2 at 22:56
    
Yes, but you first said "The police, as IT ought to be... " (rather than THEY). –  Erik Kowal May 3 at 1:16
    
I thought "it" can refer to the whole idea. I modified my answer. Do you think it is better now? –  ermanen May 3 at 1:32
    
Yes, it's a definite improvement. :-) –  Erik Kowal May 3 at 3:09

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