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In a review of, let's say, predatory habits of some animals, the subject of the discussion is the predatory habits.

Is it correct to say that the animals, then, are the objects of discussion or objects under review? Or is there a different term that would communicate this?

I found a related post or perhaps I am asking a duplicate but I did not find a satisfactory answer there either.

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I would say it's not correct to invoke the grammatical subject/object categories in this context. In general, the subject of discussion/debate is the thing actually being discussed, whereas the object of the debate is the objective, purpose, aim. That's to say it's the reason for having the discussion in the first place. –  FumbleFingers Apr 22 at 13:13

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In a review of, let's say, predatory habits of some animals, the subject of the discussion is the predatory habits.

No, the "subject" is "predatory habits of some animals".

subject — topic: something that is being discussed, examined, or otherwise dealt with

There isn't a significant distinction between "subject of discussion" and "objects of discussion". And if you can say a review is of something than it is correct to say that something is the subject of the review (or discussion).

Is it correct to say that the animals, then, are the objects of discussion or objects under review? Or is there a different term that would communicate this?

You can refer to the specific objects you care about: "The animals involved in the studies..."

But any term that could do what you request would have an inherent ambiguity. There is no significant distinction between "predatory habits" and "animals" that would allow a term to single out "animals" as the "objects of review" -- linguistically, they are both objects. The only way to do something like this is to use additional context to inform your reader which of the various objects you are referring to.

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PS) My post is fairly likely to be controversial so take it with a grain of salt. Someone out there is likely to draw some semantic distinction between the various objects but, pragmatically, such distinctions are likely to confuse readers. –  MrHen May 5 at 20:04

you can call it the topic or subject.

topic- A matter dealt with in a text, discourse, or conversation

subject - A person or thing that is being discussed, described, or dealt with

www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/topic

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/subject?q=subject

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So, in the case of the example that I mentioned, would it be incorrect to say that the subject of discussion is predatory habits rather than the animals –  WYSIWYG Apr 22 at 11:50
    
:-) it will be totally correct –  vickyace Apr 22 at 11:52
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Please attribute your work. –  Matt Эллен Apr 22 at 11:55
    
@vickyace I am confused here. The subject of discussion is predatory habits, which will be focused on in detail. But I am considering the case of, lets say, hyenas and tigers, what term will denote these animals. –  WYSIWYG Apr 22 at 11:57
    
@MattЭллен My work is more complex (in terms of scientific content); I would rather not discuss it here. –  WYSIWYG Apr 22 at 11:59

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