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What's the meaning of "get to do something"?

I get to spend a lot of time with you and the kids.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To "get to do" something means that you are enabled or given the opportunity to do something.

Example 1 - A circumstance or choice enables you to do something:

Why do you work at home?

I get to spend a lot of time with you and the kids.

Example 2 - Being given an opportunity:

Has anything good come out of this week-long snowstorm?

I get to spend a lot of time with you and the kids.

Sometimes this phrase is used sarcastically to mean "I am being forced to do something that I don't want to do". For example:

I get to grade 40 tests this weekend!

should be interpreted as something along the lines of

I'd rather be doing something else, but I must grade 40 tests this weekend.

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In this context it means have the opportunity to:

I have the opportunity to spend a lot of time with you and the kids.

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http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/get
21: to succeed, become enabled, or be permitted: You get to meet a lot of interesting people.

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So it is the same as "I can spend a lot of time with you and the kids"? –  an0 Mar 12 '11 at 17:56
    
@an0 yes, you are enabled or permitted to spend the time –  mplungjan Mar 13 '11 at 16:47

That would simply mean that, You are now able to do it.

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