Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a lexicalization for someone who holds a position, for example, in a company, in the army, in an organization, etc.?

All of the relevant ___________ should be promptly contacted and updated.

Position-holder seems so awkward.

share|improve this question
2  
How about: "All of the relevant personnel should be contacted." –  Jim Apr 1 at 13:47
    
You're asking for a very general word, yet your dissatisfaction with the answers below suggest you have a particular situation in mind. Just be clear about your actual context, and you'll get a better suggestion. –  Peter Apr 1 at 16:41
    
Point taken, thanks. –  Ilanysong Apr 1 at 16:59
    
Unicorns!‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎ –  tchrist Apr 1 at 23:00
    
Huh? What does that mean? –  Ilanysong Apr 2 at 17:29

7 Answers 7

incumbent

noun

1 The holder of an office or post:
the present incumbent will soon be retiring

[EDIT]
Usage [emphasis added]:

Aron & Nightgale, Incumbent Workers' Views about Lifelong Learning, 1995, p.7

… (2) evaluate the individual labor market impacts of increased education and training among incumbent workers.

Sims, Reforming (transforming?) a Public Human Resource Management Agency, 2010, p.234

a. If an active eligibility list for the new classification exists, the incumbent employee was on the eligibility list, and the incumbent employee met all other eligibility requirements, he or she might be appointed from the eligibility list to the reclassified position.

Smyth, Employed but not Engaged, 2010, p.90

If the old role becomes redundant, and a new role created, then there is no absolute obligation to move the incumbent employee over to the new role. That said, you do have an obligation in any redundancy to consider redeployment opportunities for redundant employees, and in this case that would involve offering the new role to the incumbent employee.

share|improve this answer
    
To narrow, but thanks... –  Ilanysong Apr 1 at 13:52
    
Why do you think it's too narrow? In what sense? –  Kris Apr 1 at 13:53
1  
Because I associate "incumbent" only with someone in high office. The specific context that I encountered was in a board meeting, where specific criteria were to be applied to the appropriate "position-holders"... –  Ilanysong Apr 1 at 13:55
    
What makes you associate the word with 'high office' only? Have you checked the dictionary? Can you add something to enlighten me about that? –  Kris Apr 1 at 13:57
    
Simply because I've never heard it used in the sense of incumbent junion employees. Doesn't mean it can't be used, but I think that if you do a Google search, 95% of the hits will be about incumbent leaders of countries or large organizations... –  Ilanysong Apr 1 at 16:35

Officer because anyone holding a position works in an office.

Update: Below are the words in decreasing order of preferences:

1) employee

2) staff

3) worker

4) staffer

5) official

6) officer

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Neeraj, thanks for your suggestion. Officer fits in some cases, but what happens if we're talking about relatively low-ranking people in the organization? We could be talking about a welder in factory. I'm looking for a more general term... –  Ilanysong Apr 1 at 11:23
2  
then employee looks the best fit to all workers, because if you need to fill the blank "All of the relevant __ should be promptly contacted and updated.", then this sort of line is generally issued by an employer. –  Nonymous NT Apr 1 at 11:30
    
Officer because anyone holding a position works in an office. Go, as they say, tell it to the marines. –  High Performance Mark Jun 15 at 0:21

One word which is used is post-holder.

noun
(formal) a person who has a particular job or position

[Collins]

It is likely to fit in the quoted sentence:

All of the relevant post-holders should be promptly contacted and updated.

share|improve this answer
1  
I was going to say chair-holder, but I think that's just a variant of post-holder. –  IQAndreas Apr 1 at 22:26

Functionary

I think this might be the best option. I wonder if the word make sense in a variety of settings (e.g. government, corporate world, military, etc.)

share|improve this answer
    
It could be, only you know what context you're using it in. I've never seen functionary used in the corporate world, and it's not a terribly flattering word. It tends to be used to describe foreign military bureaucrats. –  milestyle Apr 1 at 22:02

In business you would say stakeholder. Instead of shareholder, which just means people who own stock in the company, stakeholder means anyone who has a stake in the endeavor, including employees, customers, relevant community members etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks milestyle- but I don't think that's what we're looking for. A stakeholder, like you said, is anyone who has an interest in a company, a project, and so forth. Here, we're looking for someone who fills a function within an organization. –  Ilanysong Apr 23 at 17:23

I think you would just use the phrase - current X.

"Our current Vice-President is Tom."

share|improve this answer

Office holder?

But not every position is considered an office. Go ahead and coin position holder. ;-)

I agree with Peter's comment:

You're asking for a very general word, yet your dissatisfaction with the answers below suggest you have a particular situation in mind. Just be clear about your actual context, and you'll get a better suggestion.

Your template is too general, and doesn't make much sense to me:

All of the relevant _______ should be promptly contacted and updated.

If you are talking about people, how would they be "updated"? I can see that the positions, or information about the positions (e.g. who holds them) might be updated. But by saying "contacted" you clearly are not looking for a words such as positions.

In sum, if you cannot really characterize what this is about (what you are looking for) then you are likely to be disappointed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.