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That feel when you feel something and are unable to find words to explain it.

vs

That feel when you feel something and is unable to find words to explain it.

PS: My next Facebook status :P

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closed as off-topic by David M, Hellion, Kristina Lopez, choster, tchrist Mar 25 at 0:12

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Neither. How about "That feeling you get when you feel something . . . –  David M Mar 24 at 15:25
    
OK (11 more to go SE says) –  Chankey Pathak Mar 24 at 15:28
    
Please never just ask “Which is correct?” It shows no effort on your part, and gives us nothing to go on. As the Help Center says in its “How to ask a good question” section: “Have you thoroughly searched for an answer before asking your question? Sharing your research helps everyone. Tell us what you found and why it didn’t meet your needs. This demonstrates that you’ve taken the time to try to help yourself, it saves us from reiterating obvious answers, and above all, it helps you get a more specific and relevant answer!” Thank you. –  tchrist Jul 4 at 1:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Neither. You're looking for the gerund in this case.

That feeling you get when you feel something and are unable to find words to explain it.

Or

That feeling you get when you feel something and cannot explain it.

Or

That unexplainable feeling you get.

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Thanks jboneca. –  Chankey Pathak Mar 24 at 15:28
    
@ChankeyPathak Sure thing! –  jboneca Mar 24 at 15:34
    
See, however, knowyourmeme.com/memes/i-know-that-feel-bro –  reinierpost Mar 24 at 17:05

"That feeling when you feel something and are unable to find words to explain it."

While "feel" can be a noun, typically "feeling" is used instead to convey an emotion as seems to be intended here, so I would recommend using "feeling". Using "feel" sounds awkward to me. I have only encountered it being used as a noun to represent the physical sensation as from touch or else a sense or impression, e.g., of a situation.

Then for "is" vs. "are", attach the verb to the correct subject "you", and then it becomes clear that "you are" is correct while "you is" is incorrect.

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Thanks Brain..! –  Chankey Pathak Mar 24 at 15:30
    
I disagree. Expressions such as 'the wrong feel' or "the feel isn't (...)' aren't new. –  reinierpost Mar 24 at 17:08
    
But the intended meaning in that case is not the same, "feel" is usually used to represent the physical feeling from touch or else a vague sense or impression - I have never seen it use to represent an emotion as "feeling" is used. Using it to express a personal feeling sounds very awkward to me, though it may technically be OK. In this case, "feeling" seems much more appropriate to me here. –  Brian Mar 24 at 17:37
    
But you are right feel can be a noun too, I will edit my post, sorry. –  Brian Mar 24 at 17:39

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