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I'm working on setting up an adventure based metaphor for my son's chores, and one of the categories of "challenges" he'll be tasked with completing is housekeeping (making his bed, washing the dishes, vacuuming, etc.). Only I don't want to call it housekeeping. Is there are more adventurous term I could use with a similar meaning?

The only thing I've been able to come up with so far is "castle maintenance", but I'm not in love with that. Any other suggestions?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by FumbleFingers, Canis Lupus, choster, tchrist, aedia λ Mar 19 at 17:59

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You could just make a word up. That could make his challenge unique and exciting. –  Chenmunka Mar 19 at 13:48
8  
Well my dad used to say "clean your fucking room and then vacuum the god damn steps". Sounds pretty adventurous. –  RyeɃreḁd Mar 19 at 14:02
    
Do the answers have anything to do with English language? –  rahul Mar 19 at 17:37
    
@rahul: I suppose you could answer in another language, but that would be pretty off topic. In what way does this question not have to do with the English language? It's a question about an English language term and its synonyms. –  sh1ftst0rm Mar 19 at 17:49
    
@sh1ftstorm,don't take my last comment so seriously.While I did like Battlestar Housework,I am not sure this has anything to do with the language in particular. –  rahul Mar 19 at 17:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Home Maintenance Obstacle Course

The Fight Against Clutter

Slaying Dragons - Who says the name has to fit perfectly. ;-)

Battlestar Housework

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When a sailing ship was about to go into battle, they had to "clear the decks" to make room for operating the guns and fighting. Everthing unessential, even partition walls and furniture had to be struck into the hold.

Maybe you could cast the jobs to fit into that model - reasons why an unmade bed would be bad if your house were attacked by pirates or some such.

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Chore Quest, Chorebusters, The Jobslayer

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Have him watch the Karate Kid, then tell him all the tasks you tell him to do are for his training.

"Wax on, Wax off"

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This is hard(ish). I think it depends on how you plan to use the name, because I can think of some stuff... but I'm not sure how it's being used. I mean, if you're looking for a serious term it'd be one thing, but if you're looking for something really funny then it's another. So I'll give you ideas I have, but they might not all do what you want.

If he plays video games, you could probably summarize most of them as Daily Quests, although vacuuming (as it isn't daily) doesn't fit in that sense. Plus it's not very adventure...y. Still, a lot of games do daily quests that reward you for logging in multiple times, so that is a possibility. It's popular on casual games on Facebook to make people log in frequently by giving them a log in bonus, but big games like WoW have some daily quests that's just taking out a bunch of creatures which I'm sure some casual games do too.. So if he's familiar with it, that might work.

You could give each task a name itself (washing the dishes == cleaning the moat, making the bed == preparing the fields, vaccumming == slaying wild dust bunnies) and give the "challenge" that these would fall under a general name like Requests from the Townspeople or Kingdom Requests. Then he would just need incentive to keep up with the tasks. But this probably wouldn't really work unless you were writing down the chores somewhere. I mean if you're just talking to him, there's no reason to bring up that slaying wild dust bunnies is a kingdom request. Since you already made up a name for vacuuming, you would just say "go slay the wild dust bunnies". Whereas if you were writing this down, you could have it under a header that says "kingdom request" or "request from the townspeople".

But if you wanted to just count all of the chores as one thing, it probably depends on how crazy your naming scheme is already. Personally, I'm with David M on the Slaying Dragons front, because who doesn't want to do things with or around dragons? But if your naming convention isn't that wild (or you already have dragons), War against/on Grime might do it. Then you could call any task that you deem housekeeping a battle if you want to talk about a specific task. For example:

"How did the battle against dust go? Have you been keeping up with the War on Grime?"

But I think David M's answers are really good. I'd use those if they fit your adventure scenario. Especially the obstacle course one! (But the dragon one is clearly the most serious of the bunch.)

Although... if the naming convention is meant to be funny, it might be best just to call it housekeeping. This would work best if the other chores have wildly fantastical names. Like so:

"Today you have to slay dragons, go to the moon, punch all of the titans, and do housekeeping. In no particular order."

Another way to make it funny is to give it a meaninglessly long name with words that don't make sense (ULTRA SUPER FUN MOUNTAIN DELICIOUS HAPPY YUMMY MAGIC SPACE ADVENTURE) as long as the tasks are menial and housekeeping has the longest (and altogether most nonsensical) name. In other words, don't make it a synonym at all.

"Wait, wait. Did you already do the ultra super fun mountain delicious happy yummy magic space adventures? Alright, then you can go out and ride your bike."

You could make your term not a synonym but go another way with the joke by making the tasks sound difficult even though the tasks are easy. But I can't think of an adventure-esque way to do that.

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