Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Really, what the question title states. In my language there's a more "flowery" phrase to say "size doesn't matter". It would roughly translate to "even a small clown can work in the big top" – I'm looking for something that tries to maintain the wit of the "small"/"big" antithesis.

share|improve this question
7  
It's not the size of the boat, it's the motion of the ocean. comes (no pun intended) to mind...although I do find the Slovakian saying quite humorous. –  JSanchez Mar 13 at 17:22
2  
I was just wondering did you have one yourself ;) To extend on JSanchez's suggestion - It's not the size of the boat nor the motion in the ocean, it's whether or not the captain can stay in port long enough for all the passengers to get off –  Ronan Mar 13 at 17:23
10  
@RonanMurphy "It's not the size of the boat, nor the motion of the ocean but rather how well the guy uses his penis." That's how my grandmother used to say it. ;-p –  David M Mar 13 at 17:33
1  
@DavidM or indeed, "It's not the size of the boat, but does the guy not know how to use his hands and mouth? Oh you poor girl, you need to get him some education". –  Jon Hanna Mar 14 at 11:22
2  
A related question: Is there any expression used in English for this that doesn't have a stronger effect on making the speaker immediately less sexually attractive than their having a small penis did? –  Jon Hanna Mar 14 at 12:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It's not the size of the boat, it's the motion of the ocean. comes (no pun intended) to mind, although I'm sure there are many more.

share|improve this answer
12  
"not the length of the wand, but the magic in the stick" –  Roger Mar 13 at 18:35
3  
similar to @Roger: "it's not the wand, but the skill of the wizard" –  mcalex Mar 14 at 8:18

It's a grower not a shower at least implies function.

share|improve this answer
3  
Well, actually that expression means "It may be small now when it is flaccid, but becomes much larger when it is erect." –  IQAndreas Mar 14 at 21:55

One that applies to more than just sex (expressing small size doesn't imply bad performance) is:

it's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog

share|improve this answer

"It's not the meat, it's the motion" is the one I've heard most frequently.

share|improve this answer

A commonly used expression (although not an idiom):

It's not the size that counts, it's how you use it.

share|improve this answer

protected by tchrist Mar 15 at 15:09

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.