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I have an algorithm inspired by mathematical concept called hypercube. I use Hypercube algorithm as a name. Now when I write about it, do I need "the" article in front of the name "Hypercube algorithm"? I have similar situation where I call a technique with the name "Most Monomial" where I do not use "the" article because it is a name such as Donald Duck. Is "the" article needed in front of the "Hypercube algorithm" or not?

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If the name is "Hypercube," then no "the" and no "algorithm." This can vary regionally. For example, in New England we go from Route 4 to I-95, but in California they drive "the 8" . –  Carl Witthoft Feb 21 at 14:28
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@CarlWitthoft "the Hypercube algorithm" requires "the" while "Hypercube" does not require "the"? –  hhh Feb 21 at 14:32
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Yep, exactly. One is the object ("Hypercube");the other is the contents of the object ("the Hypercube algorithm"). –  Carl Witthoft Feb 21 at 15:02

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If the name is "Hypercube," then no "the" and no "algorithm." One is the object ("Hypercube");the other is the contents of the object ("the Hypercube algorithm").

This can vary regionally so far as colloquial speech goes. For example, in New England we go from Route 4 to I-95, but in California they drive "the 8" .

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