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What is the correct version:

  1. Suddenly the noise stopped, so Dani, the new resident, started feeling uneasy.

  2. Suddenly the noise stopped so Dani, the new resident, started feeling uneasy.

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2 Answers 2

Either version works with the very similar

The noise stopped because Dani, the new resident, had finished putting his shelves up.

The noise stopped, because Dani, the new resident, had finished putting his shelves up.

Some non-traditionalists would say it depends merely on whether you'd like to signal a pause after the main clause. Some would say there's a shift of emphasis (the reason being highlighted in the first version, while the subordinate clause is just additional information in the second. It could be put in brackets.)

I'd prefer the version with the comma with your example, as there's quite a semantic 'shift' involved (as fraggles says, a two-sentence rewrite is quite sensible). Also, without a comma, a 'so that' interpretation might be expected, with garden path results.

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With comma is correct, cause you start a new subordinate clause.

The commas around "the new resident" are independent, since they describe Dani only closer.

You could also split it into two sentences:

Suddenly the noise stopped. Dani, the new resident, started feeling uneasy.

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