Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Horoscope: You'll make a risqué comment to a boss who lately has had his or her head in the clouds…

From the above sentence I can understand that a person is going to make an indecent comment to his/her boss. I couldn't get what the rest of the sentence meant. The above sentence is taken from an email I got.

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by RegDwigнt Feb 4 at 10:09

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions that can be answered using commonly-available references are off-topic. A list of these references can be found here: List of general references" – RegDwigнt
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

To have your head in the clouds can mean to be unaware of what is going on because of daydreaming (thinking private thoughts preventing you from paying attention to what's important)

Perhaps she was right, perhaps he was in love, then again, perhaps not. He walked the twenty or so yards to where he'd parked the Mini, and walked nonchalantly past it, with his hands in his pockets, his head in the clouds.

or to think impractically because you believe in your own ideas or fantasies and not enough of reality

[President Johnson had concluded regarding Peruvian leader Bélaunde, after he had] rattled on about his grandiose plans for the “marginal highway” and South American physical integration, that Belaúnde “not only has his head in the clouds, he's got his feet in the clouds, too.”

The example you give is a horoscope reading that's floating around on the Internet. As such, it's a prediction, with about as much value as a fortune cookie prediction.

Edited to add an interpretation: You will say something off-color to shock a boss into paying attention to you when you are trying to work with him.

share|improve this answer
3  
@mplungjan Not true, because Susan has interpreted risqué more correctly than you. To my boss, I'd never dare suggest: "get a hotel room". :-) –  Mari-Lou A Feb 4 at 7:34
1  
It was not until I commented on this answer, that an interpretation was even given. The real question was about heads in the clouds - a bit disappointing not even getting one upvote for linking to the same dictionary first. Anyway. I amended my answer. Off colour does not have to be risqué by the way: "jokes, prose, poems, black comedy, blue comedy, insult comedy, cringe comedy and skits that deal with topics that may be considered to be in poor taste or overly vulgar" –  mplungjan Feb 4 at 8:44
add comment

I don't understand it either. "Head in the clouds" means the person is not paying much attention to what is happening around them, and has their attention on their own thoughts, or their head is filled with unrealistic ideas.

Perhaps the idea is to shock the person out of their reverie by giving them a kind of jab in the hypothalamus. In any case, without context, I don't see any obvious connection.

share|improve this answer
add comment

have one's head in the clouds

Fig. to be unaware of what is going on from fantasies or daydreams. "Bob, do you have your head in the clouds?" asked the teacher. She walks around all day with her head in the clouds. She must be in love.

risqué

Suggestive of sexual impropriety; bordering on the indelicate.

The horoscope is predicting that you will get annoyed with your boss because he/she does not seem to pay much attention lately. So annoyed, you will suggest something inappropriate to try get him/her to snap out of it.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I got this from horoscope mail. –  Ram Feb 4 at 7:08
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.