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For example, sometimes if I am working on something and it doesn't seem to be working out as it is supposed to I will just keep at it just because it annoys me so much.

Another example can be assume that someone tells you not to do something and you do it anyway just because you don't want to be told what to do.

Someone does something bad to you and you can leave it. But you can't just because it annoys you that he goes with out any response.

You get the idea I guess. Now is there a specific word for this behavior?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Kristina Lopez, Edwin Ashworth, FumbleFingers, aedia λ, tchrist Feb 1 at 3:32

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There are thousands of languages in the world, which of them is your question about? :) If it's English, have you considered the word 'stubborn'? It means "having or showing dogged determination not to change one’s attitude or position on something, especially in spite of good reasons to do so" (Oxford Dictionary). –  Yellow Sky Jan 31 at 14:11
    
@YellowSky Of course it is English :) Similar to persistence. I think Stubbornness doesn't quite explain it. Stubbornness is kind of repetitive behavior. It might apply for the second example if I wanted to do something else and I am not willing to change. But doing something just because you are told not to do it is not stubbornness. More like defiance maybe. –  Curious Jan 31 at 14:20
    
@YellowSky I know my question might be a bit unusual. It's just we have one word for all of those cases in my native language. I am wondering if there is the same in English. –  Curious Jan 31 at 14:21
    
Why not just combine the two and call it stubborn defiance or defiant stubbornness? However, I would probably describe all three scenarios with a different word or phrase, so I'm not sure what you're looking for here. –  Kevin Workman Jan 31 at 14:41
    
The title of your question may send people off in the wrong direction since your examples seem to describe someone who is pig-headed or stubborn (can't be told what to do or not to do) and possibly vengeful. –  Kristina Lopez Jan 31 at 14:42

4 Answers 4

For example, sometimes if I am working on something and it doesn't seem to be working out as it is supposed to I will just keep at it just because it annoys me so much.

perseverance, determination, resolve

Another example can be assume that someone tells you not to do something and you do it anyway just because you don't want to be told what to do.

stubbornness

Someone does something bad to you and you can leave it. But you can't just because it annoys you that he goes with out any response.

unforgivingness, possibly vengefulness

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In addition to stubborn, there is obstinate which means unreasonably persistent. There is also bloody-minded, unrelenting (and relentless) and inexorable.

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The word you're looking for is stubborn. You might also call it pigheadedness, which perhaps conveys more the idea of not doing something just because you're told to.

Another possible word is contrary.

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Consider perseveration

continuation of something (as repetition of a word) usually to an exceptional degree or beyond a desired point

The term is also used in psychology to reflect such a pattern that becomes pathological.

It is different from perseverance, which is usually looked at as a positive trait.

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