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There are stones of 1 kg, 500 grams, 100 grams, or 50 grams used in weighing balance. What are they called in English?

These weighting stones are normally used by vegetable vendors.

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It is called Taraz in India. and the weight are bata –  user63656 Jan 28 at 10:06

3 Answers 3

The word you are looking for is "masses" or "standard masses." This is what is placed in one pan (or scale) of a balance. Since there are two pans, they are collectively known as "scales."

"Masses" is not only more traditional, but also more precise: after all, since you are preforming your measurement in a constant gravitational field using a comparison, you are indeed measuring the mass and not just the weight of the object.

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Exactly, they are called "masses" as described here in this Wikipedia article: weighing scales: balance. You might add the link to your answer to make it more accurate. –  Gigili Jan 28 at 6:30
    
Dmitri: the word "masses" is more scientifically correct, and may be used in India. However, the traditional word for them in both the UK and the US is "weights", and this has been used much longer than masses. –  Peter Shor Jan 28 at 22:16

They are called "scale weights" or just "weights". You have a 1kg weight, a 500g weight, and so on.

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This is the actual answer to the question –  mplungjan Jan 28 at 7:17
    
This is the correct answer IMO. –  Zeba Jan 28 at 11:17
    
This is not correct. "Weights" weigh something down. A "calibration weight" is used to adjust a spring scale (weigh down the spring) I know "weights" have become colloquial, but for a balance, you use "masses." This is true both in a chemistry lab, and in a market in India. –  Dmitri Jan 28 at 21:06
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@Dmitri, acceleration due to gravity is the essentially the same for everyone on earth. The differences are negligible for purposes such as weighing vegetables. There is no need to make a distinction between weight and mass here. For the purposes of communication it makes sense to go with "weight" because that's the word that people use. A question for you: All the millions of people going to the gym, are they lifting weights or lifting masses? –  dangph Jan 28 at 22:53
    
Just balances, just weights, a just ephah, and a just hin, shall ye have: I am the LORD your God, which brought you out of the land of Egypt. [Leviticus 19:36, KJV] Similar language appears in other places in the Bible. I wouldn't underestimate the influence of the King James translation on English vocabulary. –  Andrew Lazarus Jan 29 at 0:11

These are termed calibration weights (also reference weights) as illustrated and described here.

They are usually sold in sets, enclosed in a felt-lined box supplied with tweezers so as to avoid disturbing the calibrated weight by getting fingerprints on the weights.

Calibration weights are known masses such as a 100g or 500g weight.

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Thanks for your info. I am looking for english word for weight stone used in Mechanical weighing balance normally used in vegetable markets in India. –  Rajesh Subramanian Jan 28 at 3:46
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Those are also referred to as standard weights. –  Dan D. Jan 28 at 4:02
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Calibration weights are likely NOT not used in a vegetable stand in India :) –  mplungjan Jan 28 at 7:11
    
They are nothing but stones that the vegetable seller would have you believe, weigh the same as whatever he is claiming it does! The iron ones with weight stamped on the them, are a version of calibration weights. –  Preetie Sekhon Jan 28 at 10:09
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@mplungjan: While true, that addition to the question was added an hour after my answer was submitted. –  Pieter Geerkens Jan 28 at 12:43

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