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The word is used to refer to a thing which is meant for only some people. For example: theoretical physics is a subject that is meant only for some people. So the word can be used here instead of "meant for only some people". (The word starts with "p" I feel").

The original, very first version of this question:

A happy coincidence The word is used to refer to a thing which you happen to come along , you are not looking for it ...but in this case "co-incidence" doesn't seem right 'because only one event is happening which is favourable to the other event (without deliberate effort or thought),there is no "co-incidence".The events are not coincident(they don't occur at same time).

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An acquired taste? An esoteric interest? –  bib Jan 24 at 17:29
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Why have you edited the question? –  bib Jan 24 at 17:41
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Yes, why was the question edited? Much of the discussion below now has no connection to the current version of the question. –  Å Stuart Jan 25 at 17:38
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I'm so confused...What is this question asking? It seems to be two completely unrelated things... In the future, do not change your question to ask something completely different - edits are for clarifying and correcting –  Doc Jan 27 at 16:41
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@Argot The point isn't that the questions were necessarily bad, it's that they're two different and unrelated questions. The answers below are now extremely confusing to read because you changed questions halfway through. –  Doc Jan 27 at 16:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Serendipitous is the word you want. If it's a positive/pleasant event, it is serendipity.

NOTE: The above answer was for the original question which was completely different from what I see above now. I haven't had an answer as to why the question was so drastically changed and folk downvoted my answer to the original question, but it's very discouraging.

(from the edit history):

A happy coincidence The word is used to refer to a thing which you happen to come along , you are not looking for it ...but in this case "co-incidence" doesn't seem right 'because only one event is happening which is favourable to the other event (without deliberate effort or thought),there is no "co-incidence".The events are not coincident(they don't occur at same time).

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You nailed it ! Touché .(if it is my question ,then there is an argument and this point leaves no room for arguement so that is why I say "touché"). –  Argot Jan 24 at 18:07
    
Thanks very much. This word is an old fave of mine I have used as an example of how you can get a word that means exactly what you asked today. :-) So could we say that was doubly serendipitous ;-) –  Å Stuart Jan 24 at 18:11
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The question has been completely edited. The original question as seen in the edit history is rather different from what I can see now. –  Å Stuart Jan 25 at 17:37
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I don't get it. I answer the question that was asked, and then someone fully edits the question to something different, and folk downvote my answer? Why? –  Å Stuart Jan 26 at 11:44
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AshStuart, Yeah that's frustrating. (I wasn't the downvoter, by the way.) –  JLG Jan 27 at 2:04

Perhaps peculiar

Belonging distinctively or primarily to one person, group, or kind; special or unique

Or esoteric

Intended for or understood by only a particular group

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Please peculiar doesn't conform , please delete it so that I could accept your answer. Esoteric is the answer ! Thank you. –  Argot Jan 24 at 17:39
    
Since you didn't delete peculiar , I couldn't accept ! And even decided to change my question. –  Argot Jan 24 at 18:05
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I must admit when I posted my answer (which some idiot has seen fit to downvote), I didn't notice your second suggestion (esoteric). Immediately after posting, I saw you'd given the same word as me, so I upvoted your answer - but I left mine because I thought recondite was also relevant to the question as it was phrased at the time. But looking at the question text now (it's been revised yet again), I think it's probably irretrievably flawed - so I'm closevoting as Unclear. –  FumbleFingers Jan 26 at 13:53
    
@FumbleFingers Yeah, the history here is a mess and I'm not sure it adds to the collective wisdom. –  bib Jan 26 at 13:58
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They say there's no such thing as a stupid question, only stupid answers. But then again they say the moon's made of green cheese... –  FumbleFingers Jan 26 at 14:07

There is the word exclusive which means limited to only one person or group of people http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/exclusive_1?q=exclusive

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This is wrong comprehension of my question , the answer was "esoteric".I know semantics !! In this case , it does not necessarily means it is "meant for only those limited people".Other people are also competent enough to be a part of that "exclusive" thing .Theortical physics is not exclusive in any se –  Argot Jan 24 at 17:45
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I noticed that you have changed your question. –  Tristan r Jan 24 at 17:52
    
Your answer has a slight difference to "the answer"...exclusive is "meant for some people", not on the basis of "competences" but on basis of "prestige,premium etc.".the answer was "esoteric". –  Argot Jan 24 at 17:57

Maybe it's unique to. When something is unique to a group of people, it is only meant for them.

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Sorry,but unique is "only one"this is like "only some" –  Argot Jan 24 at 17:29

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